full

Live for Yourself: Aligning Work and Values for a Meaningful Life with Dr. Benjamin Ritter

If you're feeling trapped in a job that doesn't fulfill you, constantly questioning if there's more to life than this, then you are not alone! You may have already taken actions like switching careers or seeking promotions, but still find yourself unsatisfied and unfulfilled. Instead of experiencing personal growth and fulfillment, you may be stuck in a cycle of monotony and disillusionment.

"Lean into your strengths, passions, and talents, and speak the language you were born to speak. When you do, the world can understand you and your impact becomes clear." - Dr. Benjamin Ritter

Access all show and episode resources HERE

About Our Guest:

Dr. Benjamin Ritter is a seasoned motivator and strategist in the realm of personal and professional development. He is the brain behind Live For Yourself Consulting, a platform that has touched lives in leading organizations, including Amazon, Google, and Yelp for over a decade. Pioneering a fresh conversation on values and career alignment, Dr. Ritter's focus is not just to help individuals clock-in hours but rather, to live a life that resonates with their authentic selves. His journey from fast-food worker to professional coach reflects his perseverance and the power of proactive career choices.

Reasons to Listen:

  • Discover the power in living authentically and how it can significantly enhance your work-life satisfaction.
  • Uncover intelligent techniques for making proactive career decisions and networking with intentionality.
  • Learn from a firsthand account about transitioning from an athlete to a coach and dealing with the transformation of identity.
  • Explore the profound influence that storytelling has on our understanding of human motivation and drive.
  • Gain insights on the crucial role of self-belief, exploration, and curiosity in both personal and professional development.

Episode Resources & Action Steps:

  • Sign up for a coaching session with Dr. Benjamin Ritter to define your leadership story and approach, and gain clarity on the work you were meant to do.
  • Connect with Dr. Benjamin Ritter on LinkedIn to stay updated on his latest insights and offerings.
  • Visit the Live For Yourself website and get your Free Guide to Creating a Fulfilling Career.
  • Share this episode of Seek Go Create with friends, family, or colleagues who may benefit from Dr. Benjamin Ritter's insights and expertise.

Resources for Leaders from Tim Winders & SGC:

🔹 Unlock Your Potential Today!

  • 🎙 Coaching with Tim: Elevate your leadership and align your work with your faith. Learn More
  • 📚 "Coach: A Story of Success Redefined": A transformative read that will challenge your views on success. Grab Your Copy
  • 📝 Faith Driven Leader Quiz: Discover how well you're aligning faith and work with our quick quiz. Take the Quiz

Key Lessons:

1. Take proactive control of your career: Instead of being reactive and waiting for opportunities to come your way, take accountability and feel empowered to create a career you love. Don't settle for a job that doesn't align with your values and passions.

2. Define your leadership story and approach: It's important to find clarity in the work you were meant to do and define your own leadership style. Explore topics like clarity, proactivity, and taking control to understand yourself better and create a career path that aligns with your values and goals.

3. Personal development is crucial: The speaker emphasizes the importance of personal development and continuous growth. Shift your focus from external achievements to focusing on yourself and developing your skills, confidence, and mindset.

4. Explore your values and needs: Understand what brings you joy and fulfillment beyond just monetary success. Identify your core values and needs, and ensure that your personal and professional life align with them.

5. Challenge limiting beliefs: Disregard limiting beliefs that hold you back from pursuing your goals and living true to your values. Embrace personal growth and be willing to take action to overcome any obstacles or barriers.

6. Make intentional connections: Network intentionally with organizations and people that align with your values and career goals. Seek out opportunities that will contribute to your personal and professional growth.

7. Learn from unexpected events: Unexpected events can challenge and change your values, goals, and career path. Embrace these moments as opportunities to learn and grow, and be open to reassessing your values and direction.

8. Seek guidance and coaching: Consider working with a coach or mentor who can provide expertise, create a non-judgmental space, challenge your limiting beliefs, and help you prioritize personal growth and development.

Overall, the key lessons from this episode revolve around taking control of your career, exploring your values, embracing personal development, and being open to unexpected opportunities for growth and change.

Episode Highlights:

00:00:00 - Living for Yourself

Living for yourself means speaking the language you were born to speak. It's about embracing your strengths, talents, interests, and passions, regardless of external pressures. By doing so, you communicate with the world in a way that it can understand you.

00:01:08 - Redefining Success

Dr. Benjamin Ritter helps individuals redefine success by aligning their values and careers. He encourages people to take control of their lives and careers, be proactive rather than reactive, and create a career they love.

00:02:42 - Career Clarity and Growth

Dr. Ritter helps individuals define their leadership story and approach, gain clarity on the work they were meant to do, and grow their career in a meaningful way. He emphasizes the importance of crafting a job that fits them before seeking new opportunities.

00:03:59 - Being Proactive in Your Career

Dr. Ritter encourages leaders to be proactive in their careers by developing multiple income streams and building intentional and aligned networks. He challenges the traditional model of waiting for promotions or relying on job boards and recruiters.

00:06:37 - Benjamin's Journey to Career Coaching

Dr. Benjamin Ritter's career journey was shaped by his upbringing and early experiences with work. He learned the value of work from a young age and was exposed to both entrepreneurial and traditional career paths. Although he initially aspired to be a professional athlete, he discovered his passion for nutrition and public health after facing the reality of his athletic career being over.

00:12:33 - The Importance of Storytelling,

Dr. Benjamin Ritter discusses the value of storytelling in understanding what drives and motivates people. He shares his own story of how he gravitated towards teaching and coaching despite his parents being educators.

00:13:58 - Discovering a Coaching Passion,

Dr. Ritter reflects on his experience as an athlete and how he found himself naturally trying to uplift and teach others, even though he initially pursued a career in nutrition and soccer.

00:15:34 - Recognizing Personal Potential,

Dr. Ritter recounts a pivotal moment in his athletic career when his coach recognized his ability to inspire and guide others. This moment helped him realize his potential as a coach and mentor.

00:16:51 - Building Confidence,

Dr. Ritter shares how lack of confidence held him back as an athlete and the importance of believing in oneself. He highlights the impact of mindset on performance and how he learned to handle his own mental barriers.

00:19:17 - Balancing Control and Experience,

Dr. Ritter explores the balance between being proactive and experiencing life's lessons. While he believes in setting goals and being proactive, he also acknowledges the value of learning through experiences and being open to change.

00:27:15 - Finding Purpose and Building a Brand,

Dr. Benjamin Ritter shares his journey of wanting to help the world and realizing that he needed to build a brand to sell his book. He then transitioned into building a coaching business and learned how to build service-based businesses.

00:29:42 - Transition from Policy to Individual Impact,

Dr. Ritter discusses the transition from wanting to impact the world at a policy level to working with individuals. He mentions his disappointment with health policy and how he shifted his focus to helping people on an individual level.

00:32:22 - Overcoming Challenges and Finding Purpose,

Dr. Ritter shares the challenges he faced in his career, including job cuts and negative work environments. He discusses how these experiences helped him grow as an individual and eventually led him to his passion in talent development and organizational leadership.

00:36:09 - Creating Live for Yourself Consulting,

Dr. Ritter talks about the creation of Live for Yourself consulting and how he researched and evaluated his options before launching the business. He also discusses his strategy, platform, and voice in serving his clients.

00:38:52 - COVID-19 and the Rise of Entrepreneurship,

Dr. Ritter reflects on the impact of COVID-19 on his business and the world. He mentions that major disruptions often lead to an influx of entrepreneurs and people reevaluating their careers and finding clarity in what they love to do.

00:41:04 - Starting a New Journey,

The guest reflects on his decision to leave his previous job and start a new chapter in his life. He talks about landing in a community of like-minded individuals and becoming the learning and talent development director of YEO. He also shares how he built partnerships with other coaching companies to gain more experience and prove his coaching abilities.

00:42:56 - Clarity and Opportunity,

The host and guest discuss the importance of gaining clarity during challenging times. They talk about how some people gained clarity and realized what they didn't want to do, leading to new opportunities and growth. The guest emphasizes the role of values in finding clarity and aligning one's actions with their true values.

00:46:11 - Defining Success and Values,

The guest explains how many people mistakenly associate success with superficial things like money or status. He emphasizes the importance of understanding what truly brings joy and fulfillment and aligning actions with those values. The guest shares how he helps high-achieving executives explore their values and redefine success beyond external markers.

00:50:52 - Overcoming Hurdles in Defining Values,

The guest addresses the challenges people face in identifying their core values. He suggests exploring memories where one felt happiest or dissatisfied to uncover themes and patterns. He also highlights the need to question societal beliefs and examine whether certain values truly align with personal fulfillment.

00:54:48 - The Importance of External Help,

Many people need external help, such as a coach, to reach their goals. Only a small percentage of individuals can do it on their own. Coaches provide expertise, create a non-judgmental space, and challenge limiting beliefs.

00:57:01 - Living for Yourself,

Living for yourself means embracing your strengths, talents, interests, and passions. It doesn't mean disregarding others but giving in a way that is most effective for you. By living authentically, you allow others to do the same and create a positive impact in the world.

00:59:52 - Action Steps for Personal Growth,

Take action by rating the podcast, downloading a free manual on creating a fulfilling career, and connecting with Dr. Benjamin Ritter on LinkedIn. These steps will help individuals spread the word, access valuable resources, and start meaningful conversations.

01:00:52 - Seek, Go, Create,

Dr. Benjamin Ritter chooses "seek" because he is currently in a seeking mindset, focusing on building his community and finding core individuals to surround himself with. Seeking is an important part of personal growth and finding one's purpose.

Thank you for listening to Seek Go Create!

Our podcast is dedicated to empowering Christian leaders, entrepreneurs, and individuals looking to redefine success in their personal and professional lives. Through in-depth interviews, personal anecdotes, and expert advice, we offer valuable insights and actionable strategies for achieving your goals and living a life of purpose and fulfillment.

If you enjoyed this episode and found it helpful, we encourage you to subscribe to or follow Seek Go Create on your favorite podcast platform, including Google Podcasts, Apple Podcasts, and Spotify. By subscribing, you'll never miss an episode and can stay up-to-date on the latest insights and strategies for success.

Additionally, please share this episode or what you’ve learned today with your friends, family, and colleagues on your favorite social media platform. By sharing our podcast, you can help us reach more people who are looking to align their faith with their work and lead with purpose.

If you love our podcast and find it valuable, please consider leaving us a 5-star rating and review on your preferred podcast platform. Your review can help us reach more people and inspire them to redefine success in their own lives.

For more updates and episodes, visit our website or follow us on Facebook, Instagram, LinkedIn, Twitter, TikTok and YouTube. We appreciate your support and look forward to helping you achieve your goals and create a life of purpose and fulfillment.

Be all that you were created to be!


Mentioned in this episode:

Unlock Your Leadership Potential with Tim Winders Executive Coaching

Feeling stuck is frustrating, but the path to a breakthrough may be just a discovery call away. Tim Winders, your trusted podcast host, offers transformative coaching sessions that integrate strategic thinking, relationship-building skills, and faith-based principles. Whether you're aiming for revenue growth or more intangible leadership qualities, Tim's coaching approach has a proven history of success. Schedule a free discovery call today and experience the transformation for yourself.

Book Coaching Call

Transcript
Speaker:

Dr. Benjamin Ritter: Living for yourself is basically just speaking the

Speaker:

language that you were born to speak.

Speaker:

That's all it means.

Speaker:

What are your strengths?

Speaker:

What are your talents?

Speaker:

What are your interests?

Speaker:

What are your passions?

Speaker:

Now lean into those as much as possible, despite any pressures that you have from

Speaker:

other people, despite anything that you think you need to do, because when you are

Speaker:

speaking the language that you were born to speak, you are communicating in the

Speaker:

world in a way that it can understand you.

Tim Winders:

Hello everyone.

Tim Winders:

Welcome back to seek, go create This is Tim winders, your host.

Tim Winders:

Got a question for you.

Tim Winders:

How often do we pause and consider if we're genuinely leading our own lives?

Tim Winders:

Much less our career.

Tim Winders:

Today's guest challenges you to be the leader of your destiny.

Tim Winders:

Not somebody else's your destiny in every facet of your life, work,

Tim Winders:

personal development, and even how you define your own success, which

Tim Winders:

is what we do here at Seek Go Create.

Tim Winders:

We talk about redefining success.

Tim Winders:

I'm incredibly excited to welcome Dr.

Tim Winders:

Benjamin Ritter, the founder of Live For Yourself Consulting.

Tim Winders:

Ben has over 11 years of rich experience, massive experience.

Tim Winders:

In fact, guiding people who are part of big names like Amazon, Google, and Yelp.

Tim Winders:

His focus, he helps you find alignment in your values and career so that

Tim Winders:

you're not just clocking in hours, but living a life that truly resonates

Tim Winders:

with who you are, I'm excited, Dr.

Tim Winders:

Benjamin Ritter, welcome to Seek Go Create.

Tim Winders:

Dr. Benjamin Ritter: I'm happy to be here, Tim.

Tim Winders:

Thank you so much for having me.

Tim Winders:

Let's get started.

Tim Winders:

We bump into each other.

Tim Winders:

We meet.

Tim Winders:

I ask you what you do.

Tim Winders:

I'm not giving your flowery bio or anything like that.

Tim Winders:

I ask you what you do.

Tim Winders:

What's your answer if I ask you that question?

Tim Winders:

Dr. Benjamin Ritter: hopefully this episode is posted.

Tim Winders:

I asked him to put in some earbuds and listen to that

Tim Winders:

amazing, intro that you just did.

Tim Winders:

So that's normally what I do.

Tim Winders:

I say, hold on a second.

Tim Winders:

You got 30 seconds.

Tim Winders:

Listen to this.

Tim Winders:

Cause you can explain a lot better than I can.

Tim Winders:

Okay.

Tim Winders:

I'll answer the

Tim Winders:

Yeah, no, come on answer.

Tim Winders:

no.

Tim Winders:

we're on a plane.

Tim Winders:

Let's pretend then on a plane

Tim Winders:

Dr. Benjamin Ritter: yeah, I got it.

Tim Winders:

Joe says, Hey, oh, you're a doctor.

Tim Winders:

I've got this situation with arm.

Tim Winders:

Can you take a look at it?

Tim Winders:

What do you do?

Tim Winders:

Dr. Benjamin Ritter: usually you start a dialogue So I asked them a question,

Tim Winders:

when was how'd you get your last job?

Tim Winders:

And they'll respond and we'll start a conversation basically to

Tim Winders:

the point where we realize that they've been really reactive in

Tim Winders:

their career instead of proactive.

Tim Winders:

They haven't really taken accountability, haven't really felt the power to create

Tim Winders:

a career that they truly can say that they love and that they've chosen.

Tim Winders:

And so that's really how I share what I do with people when I meet them.

Tim Winders:

Just telling them that you're a leadership and career coach or

Tim Winders:

provide leadership coaching that puts your career first doesn't really

Tim Winders:

resonate with a lot of people as much.

Tim Winders:

Now if you want me to hit the main points, I'll say in short,

Tim Winders:

we work with individuals.

Tim Winders:

So that means we help you define your leadership story and approach.

Tim Winders:

We then help you get clear on the work that you were meant to do,

Tim Winders:

not think you're supposed to do.

Tim Winders:

That's basically career clarity.

Tim Winders:

And then we help you take that information and grow it into a meaningful career,

Tim Winders:

either in an organization and a job maybe that you're at now, because a lot of times

Tim Winders:

people look out instead of in when you really, you can craft your job to be best

Tim Winders:

fit for you before running and trying to create a new position, or out on your own.

Tim Winders:

A lot of the clients that I work with are executives.

Tim Winders:

They have incredible skills.

Tim Winders:

They have superpowers that a lot of people don't have.

Tim Winders:

And they want to make some extra money.

Tim Winders:

They don't just want to be held, held in shackles by their paycheck.

Tim Winders:

And so basically also developing multiple income streams is something

Tim Winders:

that all leaders, I think that can do if they want to, if they want to

Tim Winders:

be more proactive in their career.

Tim Winders:

So when you interact with people, and it probably

Tim Winders:

depends on the setting, I'm sure.

Tim Winders:

But when you interact with people and you say something to the effect

Tim Winders:

of that, especially use words like proactive versus reactive in general,

Tim Winders:

what type of responses do you get?

Tim Winders:

Okay.

Tim Winders:

Dr. Benjamin Ritter: Sometimes defensiveness, but most time openness.

Tim Winders:

And usually I think the majority of the time, a question like, what do you mean?

Tim Winders:

And so then I get the lovely and lovely pathway forward to say,

Tim Winders:

how'd you get your last job?

Tim Winders:

Did you apply for it on a job board?

Tim Winders:

Or how do you get your last job?

Tim Winders:

Did someone reach out to you and ask if maybe this was a good fit for you that

Tim Winders:

you wanted, did maybe a friend or did an old boss ask you to come on board?

Tim Winders:

Is this really, do you feel like this is like the job that you

Tim Winders:

personally created for yourself?

Tim Winders:

And there's openness because honestly, we live in a world where our careers

Tim Winders:

are not things that we are taught.

Tim Winders:

To craft and create, we wait for our promotion or we ask for it

Tim Winders:

and we don't get it, we leave.

Tim Winders:

We apply to only jobs that we see in the job board, not really reaching out to

Tim Winders:

specific companies that really think that would be perfect, a perfect fit for us.

Tim Winders:

Or we put our careers and the future of our careers in the hands of recruiters who

Tim Winders:

have very different goals than we have.

Tim Winders:

And throughout that whole process, we forget to build skills of really

Tim Winders:

intentional and aligned networking with organizations and with people

Tim Winders:

that we want to surround ourselves with because they align with our

Tim Winders:

values and what we truly care about.

Tim Winders:

And I'm not saying that you're going to get a job where you never feel

Tim Winders:

like it's work because even in my own career that I've created for

Tim Winders:

myself, there are arduous days.

Tim Winders:

There are days where I need to go recharge and refill away from work.

Tim Winders:

But when I do work, it's really easy for me to see the connection

Tim Winders:

to who I am as an individual and what I want to create in the world.

Tim Winders:

So one of the things that fascinates me about what I get to do

Tim Winders:

here by asking questions is I get to talk to a lot of people that discuss

Tim Winders:

things like clarity, be proactive, take control and things like that.

Tim Winders:

And so the question, and I don't think this is cynical.

Tim Winders:

If it is, you can say that is, I know in my career that there's been a lot of

Tim Winders:

ups and downs and ins and outs, and I'm.

Tim Winders:

I'm one that's wired to coach and, personal development and things like

Tim Winders:

that are always at the forefront.

Tim Winders:

But the question that I have related to that is Benjamin, how,

Tim Winders:

what has your career been like?

Tim Winders:

Because my guess is that if we go back to the playground in elementary school, you

Tim Winders:

may or may not, I'll let you answer it.

Tim Winders:

You may or may not have had this in mind for what you wanted to do.

Tim Winders:

So this is a good opportunity.

Tim Winders:

Let's go a little, let's go over a little bit of your journey and maybe

Tim Winders:

what you've done to define what success is for you over the years.

Tim Winders:

Let's hit some of the high points.

Tim Winders:

Like where'd you grow up?

Tim Winders:

And what did that look like with your family and parents and all that?

Tim Winders:

Dr. Benjamin Ritter: I really appreciate the question.

Tim Winders:

And there are some coaches that some business owners

Tim Winders:

are out there that are just.

Tim Winders:

they do what they do because they saw it as a business opportunity,

Tim Winders:

a way to make some money.

Tim Winders:

And they're like, great, I can make some money, go back, I can enjoy it enough

Tim Winders:

and go back to my family or my friends, whatever I want to do personally.

Tim Winders:

Then there's some coaches that coach people that were themselves and

Tim Winders:

that struggled with problems that they had when they were younger.

Tim Winders:

And hopefully they go and they become experts in it instead of just say, this

Tim Winders:

is my personal experience, but they go study, they go learn, they grow, they

Tim Winders:

solve their own problems, and they go, I want to make this change in the world.

Tim Winders:

And I am in that second bucket.

Tim Winders:

And I see you nodding, so there's a bunch of different parts of my story

Tim Winders:

that resonate with where I am today.

Tim Winders:

There's not just one moment.

Tim Winders:

And I think that's what makes it so strong.

Tim Winders:

So first off, I think like understanding what work is something that we learn

Tim Winders:

throughout our lives and as we grow and through the people that work around us and

Tim Winders:

what are the jobs that our friends get.

Tim Winders:

And when I was younger, I was taught that work was important.

Tim Winders:

I wanted to work because I wanted my own money.

Tim Winders:

I did not come from a lot of that at all.

Tim Winders:

And so when I what I would earn, I would save but also get to

Tim Winders:

improve my life a little bit.

Tim Winders:

And so I started working at a young age.

Tim Winders:

I started working flipping burgers and cleaning tables.

Tim Winders:

And I still remember when they first let me use the meat cutter, which was not

Tim Winders:

because I worked at this little fast food, little like local fast food restaurant.

Tim Winders:

And I ended up cutting my hand and having to go to the hospital.

Tim Winders:

It was, it was, I got extra responsibility and did not use it very properly, but

Tim Winders:

it's just the types of jobs that I had.

Tim Winders:

I started a local dog walking business.

Tim Winders:

I was a camp counselor, a variety of things.

Tim Winders:

But I learned that work was something you did.

Tim Winders:

It wasn't something you argued about or complained about.

Tim Winders:

It was a benefit.

Tim Winders:

Something that was a way for you to earn money and make connections and try to get

Tim Winders:

out of the house and enjoy life a bit.

Tim Winders:

It was part of who you were.

Tim Winders:

I also learned though that it was not behind a desk.

Tim Winders:

I had a dad who was an entrepreneur.

Tim Winders:

He was a real estate agent.

Tim Winders:

Came here from overseas.

Tim Winders:

And he made money by driving through alleys, picking up toasters and

Tim Winders:

fixing them and selling them to whoever would buy them, same thing

Tim Winders:

for cars, refrigerators, and then eventually that turned into homes.

Tim Winders:

So I'd go with him and help repair some drywall or fix the toilet,

Tim Winders:

or there's a sewage clog, fix the sewage clog, whatever it would be.

Tim Winders:

I'd be there with him.

Tim Winders:

On the other hand, I had a mom who was with a company.

Tim Winders:

She was in education.

Tim Winders:

She was there for 25, 30 years or a long time.

Tim Winders:

So she had the stable.

Tim Winders:

Going to work, going to an office type of role, but she was engaging with people,

Tim Winders:

having conversations, guiding students.

Tim Winders:

And so there was this blend of there, you don't have to be behind a desk.

Tim Winders:

You can be autonomous.

Tim Winders:

you work hard to the point where you forget to eat sometimes.

Tim Winders:

and you help people.

Tim Winders:

So you fix things for them, or you help them grow and develop as individuals.

Tim Winders:

So that was what I was dealing with as a kid when it came to what is work.

Tim Winders:

And I think that really.

Tim Winders:

It empowered me to have this spark of being an entrepreneur

Tim Winders:

and wanting to help people.

Tim Winders:

But I never really thought that was going to be something that I'd have to deal

Tim Winders:

with, because as a kid, I decided that I wanted to be a professional athlete.

Tim Winders:

And so I know I gave you all this muck about what work was to

Tim Winders:

me, but then I became passionate about just playing a sport.

Tim Winders:

For some reason, I learned that there was this advice, Find your

Tim Winders:

purpose and find your passion.

Tim Winders:

You're supposed to pick it, and then you were supposed to dive into it, and

Tim Winders:

that was all you were supposed to do.

Tim Winders:

No one gave me an instruction manual.

Tim Winders:

They'd be like, When you hear the words, find your purpose, this is what it means.

Tim Winders:

This is the steps you're supposed to follow.

Tim Winders:

Tim, did you ever get one of those?

Tim Winders:

I did.

Tim Winders:

But I want to pause one second.

Tim Winders:

What was your sport?

Tim Winders:

What was the sport that you play?

Tim Winders:

you had to be good at it.

Tim Winders:

You had to be good at it.

Tim Winders:

At least.

Tim Winders:

Dr. Benjamin Ritter: Yeah, it was soccer.

Tim Winders:

So I ended up, I was, My dad used to say, Do you want to be the tail

Tim Winders:

of the lion or the head of the fox?

Tim Winders:

That's where I was.

Tim Winders:

I was not the best, but I was the best kind of on the second team.

Tim Winders:

I was good enough to be on the first team, but best in the second team.

Tim Winders:

So it's this weird balance of where I would invest my time, where I would

Tim Winders:

train and eventually that led me to go into college and I played soccer

Tim Winders:

in college and I was again, the head of the fox, tail of the lion there.

Tim Winders:

And I wanted to improve my situation.

Tim Winders:

And so I tried changing schools, getting on another team, et cetera.

Tim Winders:

Eventually though, I had to deal with the fact that I wasn't going

Tim Winders:

to be a professional athlete.

Tim Winders:

I did a lot of things to try to be it.

Tim Winders:

I got hip surgery to fix an injury.

Tim Winders:

I went to London for six months, played on a bunch of second division club teams,

Tim Winders:

whatever, what, whatever it is, I did it.

Tim Winders:

All I did was watch soccer on TV.

Tim Winders:

it's what led me to actually be passionate about nutrition and

Tim Winders:

fitness because I thought, if I can only get so good at this sport.

Tim Winders:

I could get healthier and I can get faster and I can get

Tim Winders:

stronger than everybody else.

Tim Winders:

Actually led to my, that actually led to my interests in

Tim Winders:

nutrition and public health and led to a lot of my first career.

Tim Winders:

But during that time, when I lost soccer, I lost my identity.

Tim Winders:

And I think this is really important.

Tim Winders:

Whenever you pick something for the first time, like your first love or your first

Tim Winders:

job or whatever it is that you dedicate part of yourself to and you lose it,

Tim Winders:

you need to grow something new because that part of you is gone, there's a hole

Tim Winders:

in And I dedicated everything I had.

Tim Winders:

To that sport.

Tim Winders:

And so when I lost it, I lost everything that I knew, how I

Tim Winders:

defined every part of who I was.

Tim Winders:

And that led me to say, okay, am I going to stay here or am I going

Tim Winders:

to fill this hole and my mentality around work, my mentality around

Tim Winders:

getting good at soccer, everything that I was to that point, at least the

Tim Winders:

dedication that I had to developing as an individual, investing in myself.

Tim Winders:

Then became like that focus became me that instead of a thing or instead of

Tim Winders:

work instead of a sport or a person it became me and that led me to dive

Tim Winders:

into the realm of personal development, confidence, all those lovely topics

Tim Winders:

that I now work with my clients on from a personal perspective that also

Tim Winders:

intertwines with our professional career.

Tim Winders:

And so that's where actually I started learning a lot of the philosophies

Tim Winders:

and theories that I know now.

Tim Winders:

and I didn't think I was going to go into this space, by the way, four or

Tim Winders:

five years past, I'm a happy individual.

Tim Winders:

I'm trying to figure out what I want to do for my life, but it wasn't coaching.

Tim Winders:

And I'll pause for a second because we're still getting into my story when

Tim Winders:

it's probably maybe a little bit longer than you thought it was going to be.

Tim Winders:

No, it's not.

Tim Winders:

There's a couple of things and I'm I enjoy these stories.

Tim Winders:

This is really I love getting into technique and what people need to do.

Tim Winders:

And we'll do that shortly.

Tim Winders:

We'll give people towards, as we move forward here, some things,

Tim Winders:

some tangible things that they can grab hold of, but see, I love story

Tim Winders:

because that's where we learn.

Tim Winders:

I think what drives people, what motivates people, we learn about

Tim Winders:

that word you brought up identity.

Tim Winders:

What's fascinating to me is how.

Tim Winders:

You didn't connect.

Tim Winders:

Both my parents were educators.

Tim Winders:

This kind of, I'll connect some dots here.

Tim Winders:

Both my parents were educators and not really entrepreneurial necessarily,

Tim Winders:

but I was always doing business stuff.

Tim Winders:

I was always cutting grass and going out and trying to figure out how

Tim Winders:

to make money and things like that.

Tim Winders:

But as I got into the business world, I gravitated back towards teaching

Tim Winders:

people how to do Certain things, teaching, coaching, teaching, coaching

Tim Winders:

with your mother as an educator.

Tim Winders:

I'm surprised that you didn't start latching.

Tim Winders:

I mean, were you one that wanted to tell other people about obviously nutrition

Tim Winders:

and all or soccer or anything else?

Tim Winders:

Did you ever find that you were trying to encourage, uplift,

Tim Winders:

teach other people along the way?

Tim Winders:

Did you have clues that maybe you are a coach?

Tim Winders:

Dr. Benjamin Ritter: It's funny you say that because.

Tim Winders:

I mentioned that I had to transfer schools to try to get on a better team.

Tim Winders:

And at the same time though, they canceled my major in college.

Tim Winders:

They canceled my major in nutrition.

Tim Winders:

And so I used that as a reason to say, Coach, I'm not leaving you and the team.

Tim Winders:

I'm trying to get to this other program because they canceled my major.

Tim Winders:

That's how I parted ways with that program.

Tim Winders:

Now I went to that other school and the coach there, I didn't

Tim Winders:

perform as well as I should have.

Tim Winders:

It was, had this hip issue.

Tim Winders:

And the promises that were made, the scholarships that were going

Tim Winders:

to be provided into taken away.

Tim Winders:

And it was a pretty serious, significant issue because I moved across the

Tim Winders:

United States to be part of this team, this program, and also my potential

Tim Winders:

future career in nutrition and soccer.

Tim Winders:

And so I ended up leaving and coming back to that team back in Chicago and going to

Tim Winders:

the coach and say, we actually got a new coach at the time it was his transfer.

Tim Winders:

And I went to him and said, Hey, I'm back.

Tim Winders:

I'd love to be back on the team.

Tim Winders:

And he's look.

Tim Winders:

you left us, I can't let you back on, you left us, but what I will do

Tim Winders:

because people look up to you and they respect you and you work harder than

Tim Winders:

everybody else, you can practice with us because I want you to motivate, engage

Tim Winders:

and coach the people that are here.

Tim Winders:

And of course, I said, no, I could not deal with that.

Tim Winders:

I still had my interests and my passions for what I was trying

Tim Winders:

to pursue in the sport itself.

Tim Winders:

But that I think was a big sign of.

Tim Winders:

Okay, Ben, you might have a future here because you're, you know how

Tim Winders:

to inspire people, you know how to guide people and you're a role

Tim Winders:

model for them per se as well.

Tim Winders:

And then there were other moments too, just in my own development where

Tim Winders:

I leaned into teaching and education and growth outside of everything else.

Tim Winders:

So on the flip side, this is weird for me.

Tim Winders:

I wanted to be a teacher and a coach coming along, but then I found out how

Tim Winders:

much money my parents made as teachers.

Tim Winders:

And that was something that inspired me to go out and start doing business stuff.

Tim Winders:

And then, but everything I did in business, I kept gravitating more

Tim Winders:

back towards teaching, educating, coaching, teaching, educating, coaching.

Tim Winders:

I do want to ask, because I do think that part of life is identifying.

Tim Winders:

What we want to do and what we don't want to do.

Tim Winders:

That's part of that clarity you talked about earlier.

Tim Winders:

And I think sometimes life does it for us.

Tim Winders:

You mentioned going back to a situation where you had probably left it.

Tim Winders:

And I don't know how brash or confident or arrogant you may have been as

Tim Winders:

an athlete or anything like that.

Tim Winders:

But how humbling was it to go back to a situation that you had left?

Tim Winders:

Because often we don't like to go.

Tim Winders:

Backer backwards.

Tim Winders:

What was that like for you?

Tim Winders:

Dr. Benjamin Ritter: I'm asked often if I could go back and tell my younger

Tim Winders:

self one thing, what would it be?

Tim Winders:

And every single time, no holds bar, believe in yourself, no other one,

Tim Winders:

no other opinion, no one's opinion of you matters other than your own.

Tim Winders:

If I just had confidence as a kid, especially in athletics, like when I

Tim Winders:

went out there and played without anyone around me, just me, and didn't get down

Tim Winders:

to myself, didn't have this negative loop of you're not good enough, you suck, etc.

Tim Winders:

I was a star.

Tim Winders:

Like I was untouchable.

Tim Winders:

There was even one game where I was put in and it was in my college career.

Tim Winders:

And I, for some reason, was in that state.

Tim Winders:

And the next day, the coach started me again.

Tim Winders:

And he's I saw you, you're a different player.

Tim Winders:

And there was just something in my mind that was holding me back.

Tim Winders:

I ended up finding this book called mind gym.

Tim Winders:

And I read it like it was my Bible.

Tim Winders:

I read it over and over and over again, because I couldn't get out of my own head.

Tim Winders:

I even went to a coach once after practice.

Tim Winders:

This is when I started learning that confidence can hold you back because

Tim Winders:

I wish they would teach us this thing.

Tim Winders:

And after practice, he was asking everyone what was wrong, why is

Tim Winders:

everyone lagging behind, what's wrong.

Tim Winders:

And I said to him, I said in front of everyone, first time, this is

Tim Winders:

when I started learning about this.

Tim Winders:

I said, coach, I don't know what's up, but I can't get out of my own head.

Tim Winders:

My head's getting in the way.

Tim Winders:

And he looks at me, he goes, I'm not your effing therapist.

Tim Winders:

And some people can hear that and say the coach didn't do

Tim Winders:

what he was supposed to do.

Tim Winders:

And I said, the coach taught me that I had to handle my own stuff.

Tim Winders:

And.

Tim Winders:

And so going back, I didn't believe in myself either way.

Tim Winders:

And that was actually one of my biggest problems.

Tim Winders:

but that was part of the journey though.

Tim Winders:

I think you were moving forward.

Tim Winders:

See, I've got these odd theories and this is going to help us as we move forward and

Tim Winders:

talk about people's careers and leaders.

Tim Winders:

I've got a few theories, and they're conflicting at times.

Tim Winders:

Benjamin, I have this thought that we can control and be

Tim Winders:

proactive in almost everything.

Tim Winders:

I really do.

Tim Winders:

I think that we can be focused and clear and come up with things.

Tim Winders:

But yet, I also think that part of life is experiencing things and learning

Tim Winders:

what we do or don't want to do.

Tim Winders:

so I think there's this.

Tim Winders:

Balance there.

Tim Winders:

And I don't know what the right balance is.

Tim Winders:

I think we just have to go on our own journey, but what are your thoughts

Tim Winders:

on that, especially leading into how we're going to talk about be proactive

Tim Winders:

in your career, so I'm setting you up a little bit, but how much of it

Tim Winders:

is just getting to a place where, I know for a fact, I will never.

Tim Winders:

I joke about the Scarlet O'Hara.

Tim Winders:

As God is my witness, I will never, be hungry again.

Tim Winders:

I'm never going to work corporate again.

Tim Winders:

I am not corporate.

Tim Winders:

I worked corporate for nine years.

Tim Winders:

I could guarantee you I will not work corporate again because of the experiences

Tim Winders:

I had and all that I went through.

Tim Winders:

So what's the balance there of just going through stuff and learning

Tim Winders:

versus coming up with a plan and being 100 percent proactive?

Tim Winders:

Dr. Benjamin Ritter: So I still think that I was in this state of commitment

Tim Winders:

that shouldn't have been commitment.

Tim Winders:

I was still dedicated to something that wasn't something I really knew and really.

Tim Winders:

know what I wanted.

Tim Winders:

So I can say that whole dedication to that specific goal was potentially misled.

Tim Winders:

And that's something that I learned over time.

Tim Winders:

I, I personally believe that saying I never will do something can be

Tim Winders:

extremely limiting because I just had a good friend out here, 64 years

Tim Winders:

old, go back to corporate after working for himself since he was 50.

Tim Winders:

And one of his consulting clients made him an offer that he couldn't refuse It was

Tim Winders:

a path that he wanted to try and explore.

Tim Winders:

I think we do learn a lot of things about ourselves that are solid.

Tim Winders:

And they stay solid until some major maybe event decides to add some cracks.

Tim Winders:

Or open a door that you didn't know existed.

Tim Winders:

Now we have our values and we have the things that we say that

Tim Winders:

we stand for and we care about.

Tim Winders:

And that's, if we can show up in, in respect of our values.

Tim Winders:

Then how we show up is more so what we find enjoyable at that point in time.

Tim Winders:

And so for example right now I'm showing up in my values of health

Tim Winders:

and helping people alter their mindsets and be more empowered with

Tim Winders:

their careers Through this podcast.

Tim Winders:

Now tomorrow I may wake up and say I really don't like podcasts.

Tim Winders:

Ben, how are you going to share your voice and your message?

Tim Winders:

Okay.

Tim Winders:

Maybe I'll go do events.

Tim Winders:

Maybe I'll go write a newsletter.

Tim Winders:

Maybe I'll hand out notes on a street corner.

Tim Winders:

Maybe I'll feel fulfilled by working just with my clients

Tim Winders:

one on one, whatever that is.

Tim Winders:

And so the goals can always change.

Tim Winders:

But in that specific situation, my dedication and commitment to the sport.

Tim Winders:

I think was something that I needed to step back from and realize this really

Tim Winders:

what you want to do instead of that one day when you were in class and teacher

Tim Winders:

was going around the room and asking everyone what they wanted to do when they

Tim Winders:

grew up, what the career they wanted, and you raised your hand and decided

Tim Winders:

to share with the entire class that you were going to be a professional athlete,

Tim Winders:

you were using that moment in time to declare what you were going to do for

Tim Winders:

the rest of your professional life.

Tim Winders:

I think I needed to go back and second guess that.

Tim Winders:

Yeah, and thanks Touche for calling me out on the saying I'll never,

Tim Winders:

go work corporate because I, I've, be careful saying always and never, but

Tim Winders:

let's fast forward a little bit less.

Tim Winders:

So we get beyond the athletic, right?

Tim Winders:

situation and your college and you move into nutrition, but that's not where

Tim Winders:

you ended up landing that probably had some things to do as I read through

Tim Winders:

your story had some things to do with how you arrived at where you are now.

Tim Winders:

go through a little bit more of the story so we can start unpacking

Tim Winders:

what you're doing for people now.

Tim Winders:

Dr. Benjamin Ritter: And by the way, I need to comment.

Tim Winders:

I think it's important when we say always and never, we can be, we can honor that.

Tim Winders:

We can respect that.

Tim Winders:

We can commit to that.

Tim Winders:

But what's really good about those statements is they lend themselves

Tim Winders:

to exploration and curiosity.

Tim Winders:

what was, what were my experiences that led me to this belief?

Tim Winders:

And.

Tim Winders:

I'm okay with that.

Tim Winders:

I accept that.

Tim Winders:

That's part of your story.

Tim Winders:

So if you have a never or always in your life, that's great.

Tim Winders:

Cause it's going to, it's going to be something that you probably want to

Tim Winders:

share on a podcast one day, or at least with your kids or with your family or

Tim Winders:

with your friends or at a dinner party, it's something that defines who you are.

Tim Winders:

And those are really important moments.

Tim Winders:

Yeah, and we'll get to values in just a moment.

Tim Winders:

I'm going to ask about those because I think they do play

Tim Winders:

into our values, but, keep going.

Tim Winders:

So you go through the college experience and sounds like you're

Tim Winders:

heading into a nutrition type field,

Tim Winders:

Dr. Benjamin Ritter: Yeah, I'll try to squash this one a little bit shorter.

Tim Winders:

So basically they canceled my nutrition major.

Tim Winders:

So I had to figure out what I was going to do in my professional life.

Tim Winders:

I ended up choosing a business degree and thinking maybe I'd go to med school

Tim Winders:

cause I did care about health and people.

Tim Winders:

And through my learning of personal development, I became very

Tim Winders:

passionate about helping others.

Tim Winders:

And I realized that changing people's beliefs would be very hard and that

Tim Winders:

why not just change the laws that force them or that dictate those beliefs.

Tim Winders:

And so I moved away from any sort of psychology or medical profession.

Tim Winders:

I also thought the ROI on that was too low and started looking for

Tim Winders:

opportunities in health that also integrated with business to make a living.

Tim Winders:

Ended up falling into a marketing associate position for a

Tim Winders:

chiropractic office and really disliked their business practices.

Tim Winders:

My job was to go hold corporate events to do some health screenings

Tim Winders:

and basically convince people to book appointments in our office.

Tim Winders:

Basically, it was like a business development slash health position.

Tim Winders:

And it was, even though it wasn't in a cubicle, I was actually

Tim Winders:

at events, it was terrible.

Tim Winders:

I wish they taught you when you're in business school, what a market

Tim Winders:

injury could lead to in terms of a profession afterwards, or at least

Tim Winders:

coach you to get a job that's more than selling knives door to door.

Tim Winders:

And so that led, I led me actually to start looking for other opportunities.

Tim Winders:

And I went and did some.

Tim Winders:

Networking and ended up being able to convince a department at a university

Tim Winders:

to hire me as a graduate assistant, and that would pay for my grad school.

Tim Winders:

So I ended up actually going back and getting my MBA and entrepreneurial

Tim Winders:

management and my MPH and health policy administration and 2 big

Tim Winders:

things happened right before then 1.

Tim Winders:

I actually was creating a company.

Tim Winders:

So that entrepreneurial spirit sparked in me that said, I hate all these

Tim Winders:

opportunities that I see for profession.

Tim Winders:

Why not just start something myself?

Tim Winders:

And I was building a.

Tim Winders:

A food brand that integrated health that made health easier.

Tim Winders:

It was called simplify health with the parent company.

Tim Winders:

And there was a food product that I basically got to the point of

Tim Winders:

launch and decided instead to go to school, which is a decision that I'm

Tim Winders:

happy with, but a decision I would probably guide people to do otherwise,

Tim Winders:

because the cost was really low.

Tim Winders:

So my choice for health policy was because I realized that I really

Tim Winders:

did want to influence health and the easiest way to do that.

Tim Winders:

Was to change our policy towards health.

Tim Winders:

And there were so many other indicators that like reasons why I chose that

Tim Winders:

my mom got cancer and I realized the corruption in the pharmaceutical industry.

Tim Winders:

My, there was some issues in food policy that I noticed around sugar

Tim Winders:

consumption and our FDA and our, and the food pyramid and such.

Tim Winders:

And so I'd be this, all this interest in personal development, nutrition,

Tim Winders:

physical fitness, and health led me to really see this path.

Tim Winders:

in front of me that was related to helping others improve their own

Tim Winders:

health is really attractive and something I was passionate about.

Tim Winders:

You could see this value of health become pretty solidified

Tim Winders:

through these experiences.

Tim Winders:

so fast forward and I actually ended up randomly meeting someone who asked

Tim Winders:

me to come in full time as a coach.

Tim Winders:

And I this is like a big divot in the story, but it was the first time ever

Tim Winders:

that coaching became a profession for me because someone noticed that I knew how

Tim Winders:

to handle myself in social situations and the level of confidence that I would

Tim Winders:

bring and the way that I would teach people about how to do it themselves.

Tim Winders:

So I worked for this individual for a year, on the side and didn't

Tim Winders:

also like his business practices and ended up branching off.

Tim Winders:

But then realizing though that I still wanted to help the world, I

Tim Winders:

realized that there were some issues in people overall, specifically men.

Tim Winders:

And I wanted to get that information out there in a way that was helpful to them.

Tim Winders:

So I wrote a book and then realized though that no one would buy

Tim Winders:

my book because I was a nobody.

Tim Winders:

I had no brand.

Tim Winders:

And so I said, how do I sell more copies of my book?

Tim Winders:

And I said, I better start a company and become an own individual.

Tim Winders:

And so that for five years, I built a coaching business with a business

Tim Winders:

partner and really learned how to build service based businesses because of

Tim Winders:

that, that, that experience, literally just trying to sell copies of my book.

Tim Winders:

right?

Tim Winders:

Dr. Benjamin Ritter: I'm at a, yeah.

Tim Winders:

I'll pause.

Tim Winders:

there's a contrast here that I want to drill down on because,

Tim Winders:

it sounds like there was a transition at one point from you wanting to

Tim Winders:

impact and change the world at a high level, we'll call it governmental

Tim Winders:

policy, corporate structure level.

Tim Winders:

To all of a sudden now you're shifting to the individual and I want to tell

Tim Winders:

you, I don't want to go down this rabbit hole, but I can almost guarantee you

Tim Winders:

that thought processes you have about the health industry and things like that.

Tim Winders:

I could, I don't want to go down that path, but I am pretty

Tim Winders:

confident we're on the same page.

Tim Winders:

My wife and I were just having a conversation this morning.

Tim Winders:

about some articles that have come out about the use of oils and some

Tim Winders:

different things and the way they're in input into our foods and all

Tim Winders:

that and I'm no expert in that.

Tim Winders:

I just know that I'm mindful of all the things going on.

Tim Winders:

I'm fortunate that my wife studies a lot of that more than I do.

Tim Winders:

And so she says, eat this and don't eat this, but tell me a little

Tim Winders:

bit more about the transition from changing things at the policy level.

Tim Winders:

Which I'm, I could be a little cynical about what's going on in our governmental

Tim Winders:

levels, our three letter agencies, and the big corporations, and I'm a free

Tim Winders:

enterprise guy, by the way, I want to state that clearly, but yet in the

Tim Winders:

pharmaceutical industry and things like that, it's just very difficult

Tim Winders:

for me to see how some of that can change, to all of a sudden, you are

Tim Winders:

working with individuals, changing them one, At a time, maybe a book

Tim Winders:

changes more than that, but tell me a little bit about that, Ben, because

Tim Winders:

that's a bit of a contrast there to me.

Tim Winders:

Dr. Benjamin Ritter: So I skipped over some moments that I think are really

Tim Winders:

important, and these are also what led me to this concept of never having work

Tim Winders:

be more than who you are, never creating anything that is more than who you are.

Tim Winders:

And then also just really taking more control of your career path.

Tim Winders:

And because so many of the things that I thought I wanted to do

Tim Winders:

ended up getting pretty crushed.

Tim Winders:

And out of graduate school, I actually was working for the

Tim Winders:

Illinois Department of Public Health.

Tim Winders:

I was in policy.

Tim Winders:

And I worked for them for about half a year.

Tim Winders:

They lost federal funding in about 2010, so a lot of the

Tim Winders:

jobs that were there got cut.

Tim Winders:

And then I also got four other job offers in health policy that also got cut.

Tim Winders:

So I would get a contract, sign on that line, CDC, also the FQHC.

Tim Winders:

So these are like medical centers.

Tim Winders:

And so for two and a half years, I explored health policy, and was

Tim Winders:

pretty disappointed with it overall.

Tim Winders:

And.

Tim Winders:

That was a very difficult time.

Tim Winders:

I almost lost my purpose and my values, or my values, not my purpose, towards what

Tim Winders:

I was trying to work towards because of what I could not achieve in my career.

Tim Winders:

I also did not know what I know now.

Tim Winders:

And at the same time, it also was an incredible time in my life because

Tim Winders:

I took every job I could find.

Tim Winders:

I was the king of gig positions.

Tim Winders:

I was laying on tables getting ultrasounded.

Tim Winders:

I was handing out granola bars on street corners.

Tim Winders:

I, it led me to my career in hospitality.

Tim Winders:

So I worked 10 years part time slash full time because I was still working

Tim Winders:

in, as a bartender, but I did everything.

Tim Winders:

I was security.

Tim Winders:

I was a bar back.

Tim Winders:

You could imagine, but it taught me a lot about people.

Tim Winders:

And also helped me grow as an individual because it puts you in

Tim Winders:

so many different social situations.

Tim Winders:

My parents actually met at waiting tables, which is funny

Tim Winders:

that I ended up in that space.

Tim Winders:

and then I networked from across the bar, actually.

Tim Winders:

And by the way, the 10 years of hospitality was because I also still

Tim Winders:

worked part time while I worked full time.

Tim Winders:

So it was only like that two and a half year window.

Tim Winders:

But then I was working across the bar and networked with an ICU manager.

Tim Winders:

It's an intensive care unit in acute care hospital.

Tim Winders:

And I ended up getting the person I was seeing at the time a job there.

Tim Winders:

She was an RN.

Tim Winders:

And then interviewing for a group systems analyst position.

Tim Winders:

So it was working in performance improvement, basically understanding

Tim Winders:

data, understanding care practices, becoming an expert in what the best

Tim Winders:

type of care is, and then implementing that within the hospital itself.

Tim Winders:

I ended up actually not getting hired because the VP at the

Tim Winders:

time, find out, found out I was in hospitality and bartending,

Tim Winders:

didn't want to hire a bartender.

Tim Winders:

So a year passes, that person ends up going to another position

Tim Winders:

to train, to become the CEO.

Tim Winders:

And then they bring me back under the radar and hire me in.

Tim Winders:

And that's actually how I get into healthcare.

Tim Winders:

So that I had a lot of crushing moments in that time, but it ended up

Tim Winders:

still leading me into the healthcare system, which I did really enjoy

Tim Winders:

for the first couple of years.

Tim Winders:

It taught me, it just really helped my, it fed my values of.

Tim Winders:

Of care and benevolence and health and that I got to train people

Tim Winders:

actually on best care practices taught me to facilitate and

Tim Winders:

present all those lovely things.

Tim Winders:

But then I got promoted into the executive team, which ended up tearing away a

Tim Winders:

lot of the things that I cared about.

Tim Winders:

I was mostly focusing on financial reports and business development

Tim Winders:

and corporate report outs.

Tim Winders:

And at the same time I had leadership.

Tim Winders:

That was terrible.

Tim Winders:

Like sitting there and looking at every sentence and changing a word, staying

Tim Winders:

there until eight or nine o'clock at night, where I'd say, Hey, everyone, I

Tim Winders:

have to leave, and I would just leave.

Tim Winders:

And it taught me how to create boundaries and how, what signs of a negative work

Tim Winders:

environment were and negative leadership.

Tim Winders:

And then guess what?

Tim Winders:

I get selected for 16 months of leadership training, get paired up with

Tim Winders:

my own executive coach, director of people, he wasn't called an executive

Tim Winders:

coach, and I learned that, Oh, wow.

Tim Winders:

This is the overlap of every single thing.

Tim Winders:

That I've cared about in my career and it's right in front of me and

Tim Winders:

how do I make this happen for myself?

Tim Winders:

and the cool thing that about that is that there was this

Tim Winders:

meandering journey along the way that puts you in that place so that now you

Tim Winders:

could start really getting a vision or a glimpse of that thing that is

Tim Winders:

probably going to define what you do.

Tim Winders:

And I think a lot of people's Journeys are that way.

Tim Winders:

So was it shortly after that, that you started the live for yourself or

Tim Winders:

bridge that gap real quickly, because I want to migrate and move into, what

Tim Winders:

people can do that are going through these journeys on their own also,

Tim Winders:

and how we can, give them some value so that it'll help them some tools.

Tim Winders:

Dr. Benjamin Ritter: So right when I got promoted into this position and

Tim Winders:

I got selected for this leadership program, I was on my way out.

Tim Winders:

I kept looking for different opportunities.

Tim Winders:

I was really angry at my job.

Tim Winders:

I was the victim of my employer.

Tim Winders:

I blamed my situation for where I was and it.

Tim Winders:

It was not a very good time.

Tim Winders:

Again, it was another point in my career where I did not feel like I had control

Tim Winders:

that I felt like I was not making choices.

Tim Winders:

And then this just light bulb went off when I realized that this position

Tim Winders:

existed and that I could change where I was and what I was doing and that

Tim Winders:

I was playing a victim and everything I learned about how to develop as a

Tim Winders:

human being as in my personal life, that I was a personal coach at the time

Tim Winders:

I could do for my professional life.

Tim Winders:

And the fact that I wasn't.

Tim Winders:

And the fact that they weren't teaching this was a bigger issue to me than

Tim Winders:

the personal coaching side of things.

Tim Winders:

And so the first thing I did was when I realized what I wanted to do and

Tim Winders:

realized it existed within my corporate site of 13 different hospitals,

Tim Winders:

I went to the VP and I said, Hey, you said I wasn't very disengaged.

Tim Winders:

I know how to become engaged.

Tim Winders:

I want to get involved in these projects.

Tim Winders:

And I started crafting my position to be in alignment with talent development

Tim Winders:

and organizational development work.

Tim Winders:

Sadly, this is another fun little moment.

Tim Winders:

We got acquired for the second time and they fired everyone I was working with.

Tim Winders:

And everything I was working on got, got paused and stopped.

Tim Winders:

stopped actually in this position, by the way, I went through two

Tim Winders:

different CEOs, four different direct managers, two different acquisitions.

Tim Winders:

it was a very ambiguous time.

Tim Winders:

It's a theme throughout my entire career, even after that.

Tim Winders:

And so I said, I want to do this.

Tim Winders:

How do I do it?

Tim Winders:

And so I started looking for jobs.

Tim Winders:

No one would hire me with my background at the time.

Tim Winders:

I also didn't know how to rebrand myself like I do now for people, which

Tim Winders:

is another, again, why I do what I do.

Tim Winders:

So I went back and said, how do I become credible?

Tim Winders:

let's go get my doctorate.

Tim Winders:

And after I get my doctorate during the time of getting my doctorate,

Tim Winders:

I can probably figure out where I want to play in the space.

Tim Winders:

I know how to build a business.

Tim Winders:

I built a business before this.

Tim Winders:

I wrote a book before this.

Tim Winders:

I built a brand.

Tim Winders:

I was writing for ask men.

Tim Winders:

I was, I was a kid getting a hundred thousand viewers on different videos,

Tim Winders:

different partnerships that I had.

Tim Winders:

I had some clients I was speaking at events.

Tim Winders:

I go, cool.

Tim Winders:

I don't want to do that work anymore.

Tim Winders:

So let's shut all that down.

Tim Winders:

then let's wait and see and evaluate and research and see where I want

Tim Winders:

to go into this, in this space.

Tim Winders:

So then about mid 2016, so about a year and a half into my doctoral

Tim Winders:

program at a year and a half left.

Tim Winders:

I thought I said, I want to create live for yourself consulting.

Tim Winders:

I've actually created the acronym on the back of a napkin on a plane

Tim Winders:

going to class one one session because I'd fly every month to

Tim Winders:

California for my doctoral classes.

Tim Winders:

I was still working in healthcare and then, but I said, I still don't know

Tim Winders:

exactly how I want to operate or serve.

Tim Winders:

And so then I kept researching, got published, got out of

Tim Winders:

school with my doctorate 2018.

Tim Winders:

I want, I had a couple of clients, had a little bit of work, but then really

Tim Winders:

took off because I was able to then figure out what's my strategy, what's

Tim Winders:

my platform, what's my voice, who I want to serve, how do I want to serve it.

Tim Winders:

But then by the way, while this is growing, for me to feel credible,

Tim Winders:

I wanted to work internal.

Tim Winders:

So then I also went and found positions as a learning and development director.

Tim Winders:

I eventually got hired by a client to be the head of talent development

Tim Winders:

for a life sciences manufacturer.

Tim Winders:

And now I'm, I've partnerships with many different organizations working

Tim Winders:

in the talent development space.

Tim Winders:

And then my one on one executive and leadership clients.

Tim Winders:

And so it sounds like around 18 is when a lot of.

Tim Winders:

Things really formed up after you got your doctorate.

Tim Winders:

What was your doctorate in?

Tim Winders:

what was the degree there?

Tim Winders:

Dr. Benjamin Ritter: Organizational leadership.

Tim Winders:

Oh, nice.

Tim Winders:

I like that.

Tim Winders:

That fits well with my, I'm a industrial and systems engineer.

Tim Winders:

I like systems and organization stuff.

Tim Winders:

That fits well with that.

Tim Winders:

there, I had two or three thoughts that came across my mind as you were

Tim Winders:

talking about those things there, Ben.

Tim Winders:

And I think let's go down this first one that I think will maybe

Tim Winders:

catch us up to where we are now.

Tim Winders:

We are, I'm going to timestamp.

Tim Winders:

I don't like to timestamp episodes.

Tim Winders:

We were going to timestamp the recording of this in the fall of 2023.

Tim Winders:

And 2018, just a couple of years later, some things merged together

Tim Winders:

that seemed to bring together a lot of things that were in your sphere.

Tim Winders:

You had health, you had clarity in what people do and how they live and their

Tim Winders:

work and their careers and leadership.

Tim Winders:

All of those seem to come together and explode is the only word I could use.

Tim Winders:

Obviously, when, in March of 2020, when, COVID hit the United States borders.

Tim Winders:

And so I don't want us to spend all of the rest of our time We've got about 20

Tim Winders:

minutes or so, but I would love to know what happened with you your business

Tim Winders:

because I know if you've got a health mindset that time was very interesting

Tim Winders:

and I won't even say anything other than it was probably interesting.

Tim Winders:

I know if you're helping people gain clarity in what they do with their

Tim Winders:

lives, that time was interesting.

Tim Winders:

So talk to me just a little bit about what was going on with you and

Tim Winders:

what were you seeing with the world and the people that were in your

Tim Winders:

sphere of influence at that time.

Tim Winders:

Dr. Benjamin Ritter: From the ashes rise, the Phoenix.

Tim Winders:

I don't know if you've heard that before, but whenever there's major

Tim Winders:

disruption in the economy, you see this huge influx of entrepreneurs.

Tim Winders:

And not only that though, we saw a huge influx of people saying,

Tim Winders:

I'm not doing what I love and talk about a platform to stand on.

Tim Winders:

And it was all over the world and people were listening.

Tim Winders:

People were, people started believing at a rate that they did not believe before

Tim Winders:

that they could do what they wanted to do.

Tim Winders:

And if they didn't know what they wanted to do, they weren't going to do anything.

Tim Winders:

that is probably one of the newest things is that I don't

Tim Winders:

like what I'm doing so much.

Tim Winders:

I will deal with the fact that I'm not going to do anything

Tim Winders:

for this point in time, and I'm going to create space for it.

Tim Winders:

And I can't, I don't know how that impacted me.

Tim Winders:

I did start seeing a lot more sales calls.

Tim Winders:

So it probably helped business.

Tim Winders:

for me personally, outside of work.

Tim Winders:

I moved.

Tim Winders:

So I moved to Austin, Texas, got out of Chicago because everything that I

Tim Winders:

was doing that I thought I needed to do in person I could do virtually, even

Tim Winders:

though I took care of clients virtually anyways, but it really put a lot of

Tim Winders:

emphasis on the virtual work environment.

Tim Winders:

And so I said, I have no reason to be here anymore.

Tim Winders:

All my other income streams that were in person.

Tim Winders:

Disappeared overnight.

Tim Winders:

And so I said, let's just go, let's get finally get out of here.

Tim Winders:

I landed in a community of like minded individuals in a city where I could

Tim Winders:

say prep fake professional personal development is something it's probably

Tim Winders:

on everyone's playlist on their podcasts.

Tim Winders:

So that's something that's been really great to be around at the same time,

Tim Winders:

actually as the first professional position that I received internal, I

Tim Winders:

became the learning and talent development director of an organization called

Tim Winders:

YPO, which is basically a membership club for CEOs around the world.

Tim Winders:

It's about 40, 000 CEOs and executives.

Tim Winders:

And so at that same time, March, 2020, I'm, I have business, I have clients

Tim Winders:

I'm doing well, I'm growing my brand.

Tim Winders:

I get reached out to by this company.

Tim Winders:

I remember the phone call.

Tim Winders:

I remember getting an unknown number on my phone and picking

Tim Winders:

it up after leaving a business meeting and it being this company.

Tim Winders:

And it was the first time that everyone ever tried to recruit me for the

Tim Winders:

new industry that I started working in other than one on one clients.

Tim Winders:

And so for me, that was a big pinnacle and a big change.

Tim Winders:

And at the same time, because that came up, I said, what else is out here?

Tim Winders:

What am I missing working on my own?

Tim Winders:

I've only experiences I have in talent and leadership development is working

Tim Winders:

for myself and with individuals.

Tim Winders:

What's going on.

Tim Winders:

And so then I built partnerships with companies like torch and

Tim Winders:

bravely and the muse, and these are companies that offer career and

Tim Winders:

executive coaching on an ad hoc basis.

Tim Winders:

So that let me build community and see what tools people use and how

Tim Winders:

coaching was actually being done.

Tim Winders:

And honestly, just proved to me that I'm a pretty good coach,

Tim Winders:

which was pretty great to see.

Tim Winders:

And because you don't really have an opportunity to compare yourself with

Tim Winders:

anyone when you're working for yourself.

Tim Winders:

And so I don't, I'm not sure if that answered your question, but it was

Tim Winders:

honestly a time of opportunity for me and I think a time for opportunity for

Tim Winders:

the world overall, even though there was some things that happened that were

Tim Winders:

very terrible, but at the same time, I think we saw some phoenixes rise.

Tim Winders:

there's a word you used earlier as we got started, you talked

Tim Winders:

about the importance of clarity.

Tim Winders:

And I think what happened with a number of people was, is that they gained clarity.

Tim Winders:

Now, some of that came from a negative situation, obviously,

Tim Winders:

but I think they learned some things they didn't want to do.

Tim Winders:

They learned that maybe life was short, maybe there was some fear involved with

Tim Winders:

sometimes fears and okay, motivator.

Tim Winders:

But, it does sound like you were well positioned for that time.

Tim Winders:

Let's start shifting just a little bit and let's move into some things that you

Tim Winders:

can share with myself and people listening in that might be helpful and beneficial.

Tim Winders:

One of the things that I noticed in reading your stuff is the

Tim Winders:

importance of values and been, I've been around a lot of people.

Tim Winders:

I've seen this in myself and seen it with others, and I think that we have a,

Tim Winders:

I don't think we have a values deficit.

Tim Winders:

I think we have an awareness of our values deficit in culture and society.

Tim Winders:

What are your thoughts about that?

Tim Winders:

And talk to us about how important coming up with those values or at least

Tim Winders:

getting closer to what you think your values might be in this whole process

Tim Winders:

of our career and the type work we do.

Tim Winders:

Thank

Tim Winders:

Dr. Benjamin Ritter: Honestly, my whole business, everything that I do in life

Tim Winders:

is founded on this one moment that I had.

Tim Winders:

And I was sitting with my business partner for my first coaching practice.

Tim Winders:

And we were in his apartment in Chicago, about a block,

Tim Winders:

block away from the hospital.

Tim Winders:

That's, it was a really convenient situation.

Tim Winders:

And we were sitting there talking about relationships.

Tim Winders:

And all of a sudden I go, you know what the issue is?

Tim Winders:

what are you talking about?

Tim Winders:

I said, the issue is our values.

Tim Winders:

What do you, he's what?

Tim Winders:

The reason why we have conflict in relationships and why they don't work

Tim Winders:

out is because of value misalignment.

Tim Winders:

And that statement, it evolved into a lot of things.

Tim Winders:

I ended up leading interfaith relationship workshops to help people explore their

Tim Winders:

values and to understand why there was conflict and why there wasn't conflict

Tim Winders:

and what your values meant to you.

Tim Winders:

And then that is okay, so this isn't exactly the modality that

Tim Winders:

I want to explore values in.

Tim Winders:

So what about helping people with their values in other areas of their life?

Tim Winders:

That led to me doing my doctoral research.

Tim Winders:

And the relationship between job satisfaction and value congruence.

Tim Winders:

And that led me then to founding one of the pillars of live as values.

Tim Winders:

And right now, one of the number one exercises that I have with my clients

Tim Winders:

when it comes to clarity, other than what your future vision is and what

Tim Winders:

your goals are, we start with what are your values and people do not know what

Tim Winders:

their values are and the assessments that are in the world give you a word.

Tim Winders:

But they make you do nothing with it.

Tim Winders:

And the biggest mistake that we have when we think we know our values, other than

Tim Winders:

the fact that sometimes we choose anti values, which are values that are not

Tim Winders:

actually values in themselves, is that we don't define them for the different areas

Tim Winders:

of our life and understand what it means to have that value in terms of an action

Tim Winders:

and living every day type of operation.

Tim Winders:

So one of the things that we hit pretty hard here, it's like a theme

Tim Winders:

of the last 200 and something episodes.

Tim Winders:

I didn't realize this early on, but we I don't want to say we

Tim Winders:

beat up on the word success, but I think we beat up on the definition

Tim Winders:

that most people have of success.

Tim Winders:

And the reason why is that I think most people.

Tim Winders:

Copy or they duplicate or they don't think about it.

Tim Winders:

And to me, what you just said, and I'll say this and let you expand on it.

Tim Winders:

What you just said is the foundation to then how we go about defining whatever.

Tim Winders:

Air quotes here, success means, you and I could have people come to us

Tim Winders:

and want coaching and they can say, you know, I just, I want to make

Tim Winders:

more money and we could probably help them do that, but I just, I get to

Tim Winders:

the point where I don't want to do that anymore, I want to know what.

Tim Winders:

What someone really defined success as, and it's important

Tim Winders:

that they do their value.

Tim Winders:

So link those two together, values and success in light of what I just said.

Tim Winders:

And, just share whatever you want to about it.

Tim Winders:

I'm open to it.

Tim Winders:

Dr. Benjamin Ritter: Yeah, I work with a lot of high achieving executives.

Tim Winders:

their whole life has been, how do I grow, how do I make more money, and

Tim Winders:

you go through this value exercise and they write, success, money, and

Tim Winders:

I'm like, no, those aren't values.

Tim Winders:

let's talk about this a little bit more, and it starts a really great

Tim Winders:

conversation around what does it mean to be successful, and what does success

Tim Winders:

mean to them, and what expectations do they have for success, and what are

Tim Winders:

the different components of success?

Tim Winders:

How do you break it down?

Tim Winders:

Is success safety?

Tim Winders:

Is success validation?

Tim Winders:

oh, validation is not a value, validation is a need.

Tim Winders:

it's a belief that you have in terms to feel confident and worthy.

Tim Winders:

Okay, so now we're getting to the heart of it.

Tim Winders:

What is it that you feel is really important?

Tim Winders:

And very often we just think success is our driver when it's not.

Tim Winders:

Great, you have all the money in the world.

Tim Winders:

What do you do now?

Tim Winders:

What's important to you?

Tim Winders:

And.

Tim Winders:

If we have things, if we have needs, like status, we ask

Tim Winders:

ourselves, why do we have that need?

Tim Winders:

Where does it come from?

Tim Winders:

And so we mistakenly label something as our value, which is really

Tim Winders:

actually something that we've learned from society that we need

Tim Winders:

to usually feel safe or confident and to believe that we're worthy.

Tim Winders:

And so we can break that down even more to say, okay, so if you can

Tim Winders:

actually get rid of that and let go of those limiting beliefs, because

Tim Winders:

that's what they are, then what do you actually deem as important?

Tim Winders:

What lights you up?

Tim Winders:

What creates?

Tim Winders:

What is something that you're passionate about?

Tim Winders:

What is something that brings you joy and fulfillment?

Tim Winders:

It's not the money.

Tim Winders:

It's what the money can bring for you.

Tim Winders:

And that then leads to us figuring out what are those key terms or phrases

Tim Winders:

that you that we could ascribe as being your value potentially and then we can

Tim Winders:

dive into those more and look at some memories where those have existed We

Tim Winders:

can look at them even more and say how does this come across in your personal

Tim Winders:

professional life or your relationships?

Tim Winders:

And then we can define those specifically and then say, how are you living them

Tim Winders:

now or where are you not living them?

Tim Winders:

How would you rate these areas of your life?

Tim Winders:

And then what actions can we take to live more true to your values?

Tim Winders:

So I went a little bit further than the question, but I think it's important

Tim Winders:

to at least tie some of the dots together to help people if they're

Tim Winders:

looking to do this for themselves.

Tim Winders:

No, that ties it together.

Tim Winders:

And that's great because it leads into something I was going to ask

Tim Winders:

is, I think maybe this is a hurdle.

Tim Winders:

I don't know.

Tim Winders:

You can say what you've seen related to this.

Tim Winders:

I see many people that go for what I call the superficial.

Tim Winders:

Stuff that was you know success and listen i'm not anti money I'm, not anti cars in

Tim Winders:

the garage or any of that kind of stuff I'm not against all that But also when

Tim Winders:

you go through life and you've had that and then lost it and then gained it again

Tim Winders:

You have a different perspective about it.

Tim Winders:

And that's a little bit of our story.

Tim Winders:

But then the thing that's Challenging to me as a coach.

Tim Winders:

I run into this as a coach and just interacting with people and I see it

Tim Winders:

when I'm with people that are, I guess they're having difficulty digging

Tim Winders:

a little bit more to get to what I'll call their root value system.

Tim Winders:

I think some are at different levels.

Tim Winders:

And so I'm going to ask you, what are some hurdles that people have to get to?

Tim Winders:

I'm calling it root.

Tim Winders:

If you've got a different word for it, that's fine.

Tim Winders:

And what are some things if someone's listening in and they're going, I don't

Tim Winders:

even know if i've dug down and gotten to them I don't know where I am with

Tim Winders:

my value system just a few things and I know it's probably deeper than just a

Tim Winders:

few minute conversation But help someone get a few steps farther than they are

Tim Winders:

right now If they're concerned that they've got some disconnects right there

Tim Winders:

Dr. Benjamin Ritter: That root question, it's true.

Tim Winders:

People tend to ascribe importance to values that are more

Tim Winders:

about success or achievement.

Tim Winders:

Or maybe even what they think is true based on their upbringing

Tim Winders:

or their current environment.

Tim Winders:

And those can really hold you back.

Tim Winders:

And part of understand there's no right or wrong, by the way, if something

Tim Winders:

serves you and you get value from it and you're happy, then great, I'm

Tim Winders:

not here to tell you that it's wrong.

Tim Winders:

It's not at all what I want to do.

Tim Winders:

But if you come to me and tell me that you're unhappy and you're unfulfilled

Tim Winders:

and you feel stuck and you can't feel that you can't be present and you

Tim Winders:

can't have positive relationships and you don't feel like your work is right

Tim Winders:

and you feel like you're underutilized and there's more you should be doing

Tim Winders:

but you don't know what, then great, we can start questioning your values.

Tim Winders:

If you feel that way.

Tim Winders:

And we should start questioning your values.

Tim Winders:

And all that means is, are you showing up in a way that is

Tim Winders:

actually meaningful to you?

Tim Winders:

Simple question.

Tim Winders:

And if you are dissatisfied, if you are unhappy, if you feel stuck, if

Tim Winders:

your relationships are filled with conflict, I promise you that you're not.

Tim Winders:

And so that the question then comes, great, so I don't care what you believe.

Tim Winders:

I don't care.

Tim Winders:

Take no matter how many limiting beliefs that you have, if you're

Tim Winders:

tied to success and achievement and wealth or whatever it is.

Tim Winders:

And because, by the way, wealth is important after you become

Tim Winders:

aligned to your values even, too.

Tim Winders:

This is also, interestingly enough, my, from my dissertation and my

Tim Winders:

research, you found healthcare workers super high in value alignment

Tim Winders:

when it comes to benevolence and care and all those types of things.

Tim Winders:

But because their intrinsic values were fed, Their extrinsic values became

Tim Winders:

more important to them, and so they still needed higher levels of wealth

Tim Winders:

and benefits and recognition, etc.

Tim Winders:

And I see this in my own life.

Tim Winders:

I show up every day, I love my work, but now I have other needs that I want to

Tim Winders:

meet because I know that it's possible.

Tim Winders:

And once you open the door to possibilities, you can put a level of

Tim Winders:

awareness and importance to anything that you want as long as you still show up in

Tim Winders:

a way that matters to you and it doesn't add negativity or pressure to your life.

Tim Winders:

So that's a little bit of a sidebar.

Tim Winders:

So to define your values though, quick exercise, anyone can do this.

Tim Winders:

And I hinted this already is you want to explore memories where

Tim Winders:

you're the happiest or dissatisfied.

Tim Winders:

And in those moments, when you were happiest in your life, you were

Tim Winders:

probably forming things that you thought were really important to you.

Tim Winders:

And in moments where you were really dissatisfied, you were probably

Tim Winders:

forming things that were really.

Tim Winders:

not important to you, or anti important, the things that you strive away from,

Tim Winders:

the things that your body goes, not safe, not good, shouldn't be here.

Tim Winders:

And those memories can hint at the things that you want to hold true at your core.

Tim Winders:

And so you explore those memories for themes.

Tim Winders:

And then you also ask yourself the question after doing that exercise.

Tim Winders:

So you've had these defining moments, you have these memories now.

Tim Winders:

You ask yourself, what is most important about who I am?

Tim Winders:

And then you just free write.

Tim Winders:

Just go, there's no right, there's no wrong, there's no words you have to use.

Tim Winders:

And then after you're done with that, you do what's called

Tim Winders:

almost like keyword coloring.

Tim Winders:

So you look for the similar keywords that you have, you color them in, you

Tim Winders:

notice the themes that are happening, you write out those themes, and

Tim Winders:

eventually you have a bulk of information that is the thread of similarity

Tim Winders:

between that work that you just did.

Tim Winders:

And those threads of similarities now you can break down into

Tim Winders:

keywords and short phrases.

Tim Winders:

And when you get that information, those hint at what your values are, they're not

Tim Winders:

prioritized at the moment, and they're not defined, and so they're not aligned

Tim Winders:

to the different components of your life, like relationships, and personal, and

Tim Winders:

intimate, and work, but that's at least the start of saying, okay, there's this

Tim Winders:

bulk of stuff that I have, these, my values are here, and now you can start

Tim Winders:

prioritizing them and defining them.

Tim Winders:

So ben how many people?

Tim Winders:

This is a this might be an unanswerable question, but i'm going to ask it

Tim Winders:

anyway I believe that some people can do that on their own, but

Tim Winders:

many people need external help.

Tim Winders:

Hence, we have two coaches talking on a conversation right here.

Tim Winders:

Have you run across a lot of people, and maybe we know them, maybe they're

Tim Winders:

some of the people we see in society and culture, that have reached certain levels.

Tim Winders:

How easy is it for someone to do that on their own, versus how important

Tim Winders:

is it to get somebody like you or a coach or somebody to help them along?

Tim Winders:

Dr. Benjamin Ritter: Most of the people that hire me, all of the people that

Tim Winders:

hire me can't do it on their own.

Tim Winders:

So I have a very different

Tim Winders:

You have a bias.

Tim Winders:

Dr. Benjamin Ritter: a bias, my, my sample size is very much niche, but I

Tim Winders:

bet probably 98 percent of the people listening heard that very quick order

Tim Winders:

of operations and finding your values and 98 percent of them aren't going to

Tim Winders:

do it of the people that want to do it, like of the people that actually feel

Tim Winders:

like this would be beneficial to them.

Tim Winders:

And so we want to do things in our life, but not, we don't have

Tim Winders:

a life usually that's oriented towards making space for it.

Tim Winders:

And so that's why coaches tend to be really important, not just for their

Tim Winders:

expertise, not for their ability to peel back the layers, not for the fact that

Tim Winders:

they create a space that includes no judgment and does not have your limiting

Tim Winders:

beliefs and can challenge and question you and orient you in a way that you can't do

Tim Winders:

yourself, but, and all that's important.

Tim Winders:

But sometimes there are people, even like myself, that are very self driven and

Tim Winders:

are able to learn things on their own.

Tim Winders:

But are you willing to set aside the time and make this the most important part of

Tim Winders:

your life right now as you do the work?

Tim Winders:

And I think that is even more important than even just being with an expert.

Tim Winders:

And it is few and far between that I see those types of individuals.

Tim Winders:

Yeah, I would agree from my perspective too.

Tim Winders:

It's like there's some people that just have this growth mindset.

Tim Winders:

Some people lean towards the fixed and those people that are growth are

Tim Winders:

going to be moving in a direction that is going to be helpful to

Tim Winders:

what we're talking about here.

Tim Winders:

The name live for yourself.

Tim Winders:

I think, especially because we've got a lot of people of faith here

Tim Winders:

that sometimes have this bigger perspective, I think sometimes

Tim Winders:

people struggle with the self part.

Tim Winders:

They really do think maybe, I don't want to say they're not worthy or

Tim Winders:

something like that, Ben, but they might struggle with that live for yourself.

Tim Winders:

Talk a little bit about that.

Tim Winders:

And maybe.

Tim Winders:

Speak to someone who might be thinking, no, I need to live for everybody else.

Tim Winders:

I need to, live for family or I just need to go out and grind it

Tim Winders:

out and make this money for, this talk a little bit about that.

Tim Winders:

Then I've got a couple of questions as we wrap up here, just to help people move

Tim Winders:

along and get some resources for them.

Tim Winders:

Dr. Benjamin Ritter: Living for yourself is basically just speaking the

Tim Winders:

language that you were born to speak.

Tim Winders:

That's all it means.

Tim Winders:

What are your strengths?

Tim Winders:

What are your talents?

Tim Winders:

What are your interests?

Tim Winders:

What are your passions?

Tim Winders:

Now lean into those as much as possible, despite any pressures that you have from

Tim Winders:

other people, despite anything that you think you need to do, because when you are

Tim Winders:

speaking the language that you were born to speak, you are communicating in the

Tim Winders:

world in a way that it can understand you.

Tim Winders:

And so lean in, if you are leaning into yourself, you're living for yourself,

Tim Winders:

it doesn't mean that you're not helping other people, doesn't mean that you're

Tim Winders:

not giving in a way that's important to you, but it means that you're giving in

Tim Winders:

a way that is going to be most effective.

Tim Winders:

And that's what's important.

Tim Winders:

I wear the tree of life as a symbol on my wrist.

Tim Winders:

It's the only piece of jewelry that I wear.

Tim Winders:

And sometimes I give out necklaces with the tree of life on them or bracelets.

Tim Winders:

And the story I tell when I give it to people is to try to help

Tim Winders:

awaken that, that understanding.

Tim Winders:

It's imagine that we are all connected.

Tim Winders:

And at any time you hold yourself back from doing something that is

Tim Winders:

true to who you are as a person.

Tim Winders:

You block the system.

Tim Winders:

So those roots, those branches, that trunk, wherever you are, you make it

Tim Winders:

impossible for someone to actually be connected to the rest of the world.

Tim Winders:

And so if we can live for ourselves, we are actually allowing

Tim Winders:

everyone else to do the same.

Tim Winders:

And so be that person, be that role model, be that individual that

Tim Winders:

understands what their values are, does that work, and then gives to the world

Tim Winders:

in a way that is best suited for them.

Tim Winders:

that's very good, Ben.

Tim Winders:

and I love that.

Tim Winders:

I've never heard that language.

Tim Winders:

I really appreciate that greatly.

Tim Winders:

If someone wants to.

Tim Winders:

Move along either get resources or if you've got like a next step or something

Tim Winders:

like that Where what should people do?

Tim Winders:

What would be a good next step for someone if they've been really tweaked

Tim Winders:

by the conversation that we've had here

Tim Winders:

Dr. Benjamin Ritter: So I got three steps for everybody.

Tim Winders:

First off, go into your podcast app, wherever you are, and if you're

Tim Winders:

in, if you have an iPhone, scroll all the way down and you're going

Tim Winders:

to see a place to rate this show.

Tim Winders:

Give it a rating that you think is most important, hopefully five

Tim Winders:

stars and add a little comment.

Tim Winders:

So spread the word.

Tim Winders:

If you spread the word here, then you're spreading the word of this

Tim Winders:

episode and the word of all the word of all the other guests.

Tim Winders:

And even more so you're adding, creating an impact in the world.

Tim Winders:

The next two things I ask you to do is go to liveforyourselfconsulting.Com

Tim Winders:

at liveforyourselfconsulting.Com.

Tim Winders:

You'll have the opportunity to download your free manual to creating a career

Tim Winders:

that is fulfilling and meaningful to you.

Tim Winders:

And then once you get onto that list, you'll get links to everything else.

Tim Winders:

But most importantly, the third thing I'd like you to do is

Tim Winders:

go on LinkedIn and look up Dr.

Tim Winders:

Benjamin Ritter and send me a connection request and just

Tim Winders:

say that you heard me here.

Tim Winders:

Let's start a conversation.

Tim Winders:

I like when people take action And I love what you did there.

Tim Winders:

You gave them three things to take action and I appreciate that very much

Tim Winders:

I highly recommend people Take you up on that and you've got some great

Tim Winders:

resources over at your website and I appreciate you sharing that We'll make

Tim Winders:

sure there Down in the notes, Ben, we are seek, go create those three words.

Tim Winders:

Describe our podcast and we'll let you pick one of those words over the

Tim Winders:

other two, maybe means more to you.

Tim Winders:

And why seek, go or create, which one do you choose?

Tim Winders:

Dr. Benjamin Ritter: Seek.

Tim Winders:

And why?

Tim Winders:

Dr. Benjamin Ritter: Ooh, I need a reason as well.

Tim Winders:

Okay.

Tim Winders:

because I think in my life right now, I am in a seeking mindset.

Tim Winders:

And I feel it in everything that I do, I'm seeking home and I think I found

Tim Winders:

it here, but I've been really focused on building my community and really

Tim Winders:

intentional with the relationships that I'm investing my time in.

Tim Winders:

And I'm still in the process of finding those core individuals that

Tim Winders:

I want to surround myself with.

Tim Winders:

And that's currently where a lot of my time and attention is going.

Tim Winders:

Excellent.

Tim Winders:

Thank you for that.

Tim Winders:

Dr.

Tim Winders:

Benjamin Ritter.

Tim Winders:

Thank you for this conversation.

Tim Winders:

I really enjoyed it.

Tim Winders:

I love this type conversation.

Tim Winders:

I appreciate the depth and I appreciate hearing all about your journey.

Tim Winders:

I highly recommend if you've listened in to take him up on those three

Tim Winders:

steps he mentioned specifically.

Tim Winders:

Go to check out live for yourself a lot of great resources There are

Tim Winders:

a lot of things you can check out.

Tim Winders:

We have new episodes here every monday at seek go create until next

Tim Winders:

time He referenced this earlier until next time what i'd like to say is

Tim Winders:

be all that you were created to be

About the Podcast

Show artwork for Seek Go Create - Christian Entrepreneurship, Faith-Based Leadership, Spiritual Growth, Purpose-Driven Success, Innovative Leadership, Kingdom Business, Entrepreneurial Mindset, Christian Business Practices, Leadership Development, Impactful Living
Seek Go Create - Christian Entrepreneurship, Faith-Based Leadership, Spiritual Growth, Purpose-Driven Success, Innovative Leadership, Kingdom Business, Entrepreneurial Mindset, Christian Business Practices, Leadership Development, Impactful Living
Redefining Success in Leadership, Business & Ministry

About your host

Profile picture for Tim Winders

Tim Winders

Tim Winders is a faith driven executive coach and author with over 40 years of experience in leadership, business, and ministry. Through his personal journey of redefining success, he has gained valuable insights on how to align beliefs with work and lead with purpose. He is committed to helping others do the same, running a coaching business that helps leaders, leadership teams, business owners, and entrepreneurs to align their beliefs with their work and redefine success.

In addition to his coaching business, Tim is also the host of the SeekGoCreate podcast and author of the book Coach: A Story of Success Redefined, which provides guidance for those looking to redefine success and align their beliefs with their work. With his extensive background, unique perspective and strengths in strategic thinking, relationship building, and problem-solving, Tim is well-suited to help clients navigate through difficult times and achieve their goals.