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From Street Kid to International Teacher: Dr. John Demartini on the Power of Love & Gratitude

Have you ever heard these myths about the transformative power of love and the importance of self-reflection? Myth #1: Love is just a romantic feeling that fades over time. Myth #2: Self-reflection is selfish and self-indulgent. Myth #3: Personal growth is only for those who are broken or need fixing. In this episode, our guest, Dr. John Demartini, will debunk these myths and reveal the truth behind the transformative power of love and self-reflection.

"Never let anyone's limited beliefs define your potential. With determination and perseverance, you can overcome any challenge and create an extraordinary and inspired life." - Dr. John Demartini

Access all show and episode resources HERE

About Our Guest:

Dr. John Demartini is a remarkable individual who overcame learning challenges to become a renowned teacher, researcher, writer, and traveler. As a young boy, he faced difficulties with speech and dyslexia, being told by his teacher that he would never be able to read, write, or effectively communicate. This led him to leave school and take up surfing, eventually becoming a big wave rider in Hawaii. However, a life-changing encounter with a gentleman at a recovery class inspired him to believe in himself and his ability to overcome his learning challenges.

Motivated by a vision of himself speaking in front of a million people, Dr. Demartini embarked on a journey to overcome his learning problems. With the support of his mother, he began reading the dictionary and memorizing 30 words a day to expand his vocabulary. Within two years, he had learned over 20,000 words, surpassing the average person's vocabulary. This newfound ability to read and comprehend inspired him to devour books, spending up to 20 hours a day reading.

Driven by a passion for knowledge, Dr. Demartini made a commitment to study every discipline known to amass a body of knowledge he could rely on as a teacher. He compiled a list of every discipline and ology and set out to read around 100 books in each field. This ambitious endeavor led him to read over 31,000 books across 300 disciplines, seeking to understand the common laws and principles that transcended different fields of study.

Today, Dr. Demartini continues his voracious reading habit, dedicating himself to researching, writing, and speaking. For over 51 years, he has been on a mission to share his knowledge and insights with the world, traveling to every country on Earth to help individuals maximize their awareness potential and live extraordinary lives. Inspired by the gentleman who believed in him during his difficult times, Dr. Demartini strives to inspire others and provide them with the same support and guidance he received.

Dr. John Demartini's journey from struggling with learning challenges to becoming a globally recognized and respected figure is a testament to his determination, resilience, and passion for helping others. As a teacher, researcher, writer, and traveler, he continues to make a significant impact in the lives of countless individuals through his invaluable knowledge and teachings.

Reasons to Listen:

  • Realize the potentialities lurking within personal growth, powered by vision and goal-setting.
  • Unravel the mysteries behind learning obstacles, and how an unconventional road to victory can actually bear unique successes.
  • Explore transformative love, understanding its powerful role in self-identification and the essentiality of retrospection.
  • Venture into the intriguing Demartini Method and its influence on expanding cognitive horizons and accepting life's perfections.
  • Recognize the significance of gratitude in self-betterment, and discover how the vast array of values can give us wisdom and insight into who we are.

Episode Highlights:

00:00:00 - Redefining Success and Transforming Relationships

Dr. John Demartini discusses how love can transform relationships and business when we stop putting others on pedestals or in pits and instead hold them in our hearts.

00:01:17 - Dr. John Demartini's Background and Mission

Dr. Demartini shares his journey of overcoming learning challenges and dyslexia to become a teacher, researcher, writer, and traveler. His mission is to share knowledge and help people live extraordinary and inspired lives.

00:04:41 - The Polymath Perspective

Dr. Demartini explains how his passion for learning and understanding different disciplines led him to become a polymath. By studying a wide range of topics, he discovered common principles that can be applied to maximize human potential.

00:09:28 - Challenging Traditional Education

Dr. Demartini reflects on how leaving the traditional education system allowed him to ask new questions and think differently. He credits his unconventional experiences and encounters with inspiring individuals for shaping his unique perspective.

00:13:51 - The Power of Human Motivation

Dr. Demartini shares how his desire to change his circumstances and a chance encounter with a teacher led to his transformation. He emphasizes the importance of setting goals, living by design, and prioritizing what truly matters to create a fulfilling life.

00:15:41 - Discovering Yoga and a Vision,

Dr. John Demartini shares how he stumbled upon a yoga class in Hawaii and had a vision during a guided meditation. He describes the painting that depicts this vision and how it represents his mission to share a message with the world.

00:16:48 - Near Death Experience,

Dr. John Demartini recounts a surfing accident where he nearly drowned after being caught in a 40-foot wave. He describes how he passed out in a supermarket after drinking buttermilk and shares the vision he saw that night.

00:20:09 - Overcoming Challenges and Pursuing Education,

Dr. John Demartini reflects on his struggles with education and his determination to overcome them. He shares how he made a commitment to memorize the dictionary and read encyclopedias to improve his vocabulary. He also discusses his journey as a teacher and trainer.

00:22:29 - The Power of Love,

Dr. John Demartini discusses his belief in love as the synthesis of all pairs of opposites. He explains how embracing both positive and negative aspects in relationships leads to growth and development. He also highlights the science of love and his use of the Demartini method to explore conscious awareness.

00:27:53 - The Universal Love,

Dr. John Demartini shares his perspective on love as a universal force present at all scales of existence. He emphasizes the elegant symmetry and mathematical conservation found in love.

00:29:55 - Society and Culture,

The guest reflects on the current state of society and culture, acknowledging the fluctuations between optimism and disappointment. He shares his personal journey of self-reflection and realization that all human traits exist within each individual. The importance of embracing these traits without judgment is emphasized.

00:35:39 - Reflective Awareness and Love,

The guest explains how reflective awareness leads to intimacy and true love. By recognizing that what we perceive in others is a reflection of ourselves, we can let go of judgment and embrace both our admired and despised traits. Love, equanimity, and fairness are key to maximizing human potential in all areas of life.

00:37:52 - Breaking Free from Comparison,

The guest explores the tendency to compare ourselves to others, which is amplified by social media. He emphasizes that all individuals are equal in their creation and possess both positive and negative traits. Breaking free from judgment and comparison requires self-reflection and owning our own traits.

00:40:28 - Embracing Both Sides,

The guest discusses the importance of embracing both positive and negative experiences in life. By recognizing the wisdom in all situations, we can cultivate a sense of fulfillment and avoid being controlled by external circumstances. The goal is to find the balance and love within ourselves and others.

00:42:48 - Physiology of Love,

The guest delves into the physiological effects of love and balance. When we experience support and challenge in perfect balance, our body enters a state of autonomic

00:43:47 - Unconditional Love and Judgments,

The conversation begins with the idea of unconditional love and how children experience it in their early years, but then start to pick up judgments from others as they grow older. Dr. Demartini explains that it takes time and personal growth to transcend these judgments and reach a point of unconditional love for oneself and others.

00:44:42 - Introduction to the Di Martini Method,

The host suggests doing an introduction to the Di Martini Method, a system developed by Dr. Demartini over the past 50 years. The method aims to make people conscious of the hidden information and judgments that affect their lives, so they can achieve a state of authenticity, gratitude, and empowerment in all aspects of life.

00:46:17 - The Quest for Hidden Order,

Dr. Demartini shares how his journey to find the hidden order in the universe began when he received books on various subjects as a gift. He mentions studying philosophy, quantum mechanics, and other fields to understand the hidden order and how positive and negative emotions can be combined to achieve enlightenment and love.

00:48:47 - The Development of the Di Martini Method,

Dr. Demartini explains that the Di Martini Method is a series of concise questions designed to make individuals conscious of the information they've overlooked or been unconscious of. By becoming fully conscious and seeing both sides of every situation, individuals can experience a state of grace and gratitude that empowers all areas of life.

00:58:11 - Different Stages of Awareness,

Different people resonate with different stages of awareness. It's both helping and interfering depending on where you are. The journey of discovery and understanding is important.

00:59:04 - Connecting with Dr. John Demartini,

If you're intimidated by the conversation or want to start at a simple stage, visit Dr. John Demartini's website for various resources and media content. There are classes for different levels of awareness.

01:00:31 - Spectrum of Values,

There is a spectrum of values and awareness. It's important not to judge or dismiss others' values. Reflective awareness and gratitude can lead to liberation and love for others and the world we live in.

01:01:45 - Gratitude and Seeking,

Gratitude and seeking are key aspects of life. Being grateful for what you have attracts more to be grateful for. Seeking insights and maximizing our contribution to sustainable fair exchange with others is innate in us.

01:03:46 - Choose "Seek",

Dr. John Demartini chooses "Seek" as it aligns with our innate yearning for something extraordinary. Seeking insights and inspiration helps us contribute to the world and engage in sustainable fair exchange.

Key Lessons:

1. The concept of seeing others as a reflection of ourselves and recognizing the disowned parts of ourselves. By acknowledging and embracing these traits, we can find greater self-awareness and growth.

2. The importance of self-reflection and asking quality questions to liberate ourselves from emotional entanglements. The Demartini method is a tool that can help in becoming more conscious and aware of overlooked information.

3. The significance of love as a combination of what we like and dislike equally, and the need to embrace both sides. Love is not about wanting someone to change, but about accepting and appreciating their entirety.

4. The impact of love and equanimity in maximizing human potential, affecting various areas of life such as physiology, epigenetics, relationships, and business.

5. The recognition that there is a hidden order in the universe and a deeper understanding to be gained through self-improvement and personal growth.

6. The importance of recognizing the spectrum of values and not considering our own values as superior to others'. Embracing equality and respecting differences can lead to more harmony and understanding.

7. The significance of educational progression, both in the academic and religious realms, and the journey from illusions to truth.

8. The power of visualization, affirmation, action, and goal-setting in achieving personal transformation and overcoming challenges.

9. The impact of early challenges and setbacks can be overcome with perseverance, commitment, and a strong support system.

10. The value of continuous learning and the pursuit of knowledge across various disciplines to live an extraordinary and inspired life.

These lessons highlight the importance of self-reflection, embracing all aspects of ourselves, and fostering love and understanding in our relationships and personal development.

Resources & Action Steps:

  • Visit Dr. John Demartini's website to learn more about his work and teachings: www.drdemartini.com
  • Check out Dr. Demartini's books on Amazon for in-depth knowledge and guidance on personal transformation and success.
  • Explore Dr. Demartini's online courses and programs to dive deeper into his teachings and apply them to your own life.
  • Follow Dr. Demartini on social media for daily inspiration and updates on his latest projects and events.
  • Consider attending one of Dr. Demartini's live events or seminars to experience his teachings in person and connect with like-minded individuals.
  • Subscribe to the Seek Go Create podcast to listen to more episodes featuring inspiring guests and thought-provoking conversations about redefining success.
  • Share this episode of the Seek Go Create podcast with friends, family, or colleagues who might benefit from Dr. Demartini's insights and perspectives on success and personal transformation.
  • Take action and start implementing the principles and strategies discussed in this episode to create positive changes in your own life and relationships.

Thank you for listening to Seek Go Create!

Our podcast is dedicated to empowering Christian leaders, entrepreneurs, and individuals looking to redefine success in their personal and professional lives. Through in-depth interviews, personal anecdotes, and expert advice, we offer valuable insights and actionable strategies for achieving your goals and living a life of purpose and fulfillment.

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Transcript
Speaker:

Dr. John Demartini: Now you can actually love that individual because you're not

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putting them above you or below you.

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They're not on pedestals or pits, they're in your heart.

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And that love, is profoundly impactful and helps transform

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relationships, transform business.

Tim Winders:

Hello everyone.

Tim Winders:

Welcome to the Seek Go Create podcast.

Tim Winders:

This is where we challenge the conventional definitions of

Tim Winders:

success and explore stories of in leadership, business, and in ministry.

Tim Winders:

And we are going to challenge those conventional definitions today.

Tim Winders:

I can guarantee you, I am excited and I have the honor of interviewing Dr.

Tim Winders:

John Demartini and he has got such an extensive bio.

Tim Winders:

He's a human behavior expert, a polymath, and an internationally published author.

Tim Winders:

There's a lot more to what he has, but he has so many things that we're

Tim Winders:

going to enjoy discussing related to this topic of redefining success.

Tim Winders:

Dr.

Tim Winders:

John Demartini, welcome to Seek Go Create.

Tim Winders:

Dr. John Demartini: thank you for having me.

Tim Winders:

I've been looking forward to it.

Tim Winders:

that was a super short bio that I just gave there and

Tim Winders:

I know there's a lot more to it.

Tim Winders:

The reason is almost got overwhelmed when I was reading through your bio.

Tim Winders:

I didn't want to spend half the show with it, but let's pretend we just bump into

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each other, and someone asked you what you do, how do you typically respond?

Tim Winders:

Someone who's got such a wide, diverse background is you do.

Tim Winders:

Dr. John Demartini: I'm an educator and a researcher and

Tim Winders:

I teach and I travel the world.

Tim Winders:

That's it.

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I research, write, travel, teach, educate in the field of human behavior and helping

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people achieve whatever it is inside their life that they want to create.

Tim Winders:

That's very good.

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And I want to, this is a unique thing.

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The audience typically knows that I'm a nomad traveler coming to them from

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my, quote unquote, studio in the RV.

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You are also in a different way.

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Tell us a little bit about that.

Tim Winders:

Dr. John Demartini: my primary residence is a ship.

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So I live on a private, a large private ship, let's put it that way.

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And, sail around the world,

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Interesting.

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Dr. John Demartini: over the world.

Tim Winders:

so you're traveling and all that.

Tim Winders:

All right.

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I've got to ask a, just a travel question.

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cool spots.

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Some of the places, again, name a place or two that you,

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it really nourishes your soul.

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Are you just like, boy, this is a spot that I wish not everyone

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knew about it, but everyone needs to know about this spot.

Tim Winders:

Dr. John Demartini: I've been to a lot of spots.

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I've been to 194 countries.

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I, I, I love, and I'm going back to Antarctica in, Christmas time.

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And so that's an exceptional space.

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If you've never been to Antarctica and you want to go out on a Zodiac.

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and go and interact with the life that's there, that's an experience

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of a lifetime, I really believe.

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that was the place where I did a live performance black tie affair

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to about five million penguins.

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And is that, can we find that recording somewhere?

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Is that somewhere available?

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Dr. John Demartini: I wish I did.

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I got a picture.

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That's about it.

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I don't have a recording of it.

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It was a bit windy and, the cackling from all the penguins is pretty

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loud, but I made a commitment to go and speak to people on that,

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that, that part of the world.

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I got to speak also to a group there, but I just wanted to, for fun, I just

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went out and got them in the background and I was doing a presentation for fun.

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Yeah, the penguins.

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that could have been one of the best or most interesting

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audience, I guess you had.

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there's so many, and we could spend time on the travel, but what I want

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us to dive into is you have such a vast and diverse, I guess experience.

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and I think the first thing I want to do is I want to start with

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something that I don't see very often.

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And that is someone who uses the term polymath.

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to describe themselves.

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Maybe I don't run in those circles.

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Maybe I sometimes use the term, and I know this isn't exactly correct,

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but generalist, someone who has wide ranging, vast knowledge on a lot of

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different topics, as opposed to our world seems to revolve a lot around what

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I call specialists, people that target things and go deep into one thing.

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Talk a little bit about You calling yourself a polymath,

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how did that come to be?

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and why is that important to the conversation that we're having here?

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Dr. John Demartini: When I was a young boy, I had, learning challenges.

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I started going to a speech pathologist when I was a year and a half.

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I was not pronouncing words properly.

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I had dyslexia.

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And by the time I got into first grade, I was told by my teacher,

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I would never be able to read or write or communicate effectively.

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So I ended up leaving school, became a street kid picked up surfing, which

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is not the surf capital of Texas.

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So I, hitchhiked when I was 14 out to California, down to Mexico and 15, I moved

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to Hawaii and I was a big wave rider.

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And, I nearly died and met a gentleman one night at a class.

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In the recovery process that inspired me to believe that I had learning

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challenges and someday be able to read and write and communicate effectively.

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That one night, I was such an inspiring moment.

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I had a vision.

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In fact, I have a picture of this because somebody painted it of me standing in

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front of a million people speaking.

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Which is the complete epitome opposite of what I was being like, cause I

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didn't even read a book to them.

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And then I decided that I was going to somehow overcome my learning problems.

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with the help of my mom, cause I tried to go back to school and I failed

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again, with the help of my mom, I went to a dictionary and I started

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reading a dictionary and memorizing 30 words a day to grow my vocabulary.

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And my mom would test me on those 30 words.

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And I grew my vocabulary in two years, 20, 000 words, which is more

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than the majority of people have.

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And then I, once I learned how to get the words and pronounce them and

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practice, I was able to start to read.

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And it was the most inspiring thing in the world to be able to read and take

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a person's life and summarize it in a book and then stand on their shoulders.

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So I ended up starting to read voluminously, like 20 hours a day.

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Because I didn't know I could, I was told I would never.

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And when I found out I could, it was like an amazing gift.

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I also, at the time I wanted to become a teacher.

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And I want to be intelligent because I never think I was going to be.

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And I want to amass a body of knowledge that was most concise background.

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I wanted to study every discipline known, so I would have a body of

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knowledge that I could rely on.

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So I went to the dictionary and I literally got a list of every known

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different discipline and ology you could study, chemistry and

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mathematics, physics, you name it, astronomy, cosmology, astrophysics.

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And I made a list of it.

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And I.

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I realized that a PhD would read about a hundred books in

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each of these fields, at least.

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And so I made a commitment to read a hundred books in every different

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discipline, which has turned out to be now 31, 000 books, over 300 disciplines,

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because I wanted to understand.

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What was the common laws, the common principles that would stand the

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test of time in each of those areas?

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Cause there is, there are principles that you stand across.

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They may have different terminology and different fields, but it's the same basic

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principle, like the law of the one, the many, the law of similars and differences.

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And so I want to build a body of knowledge that I could share with people that I

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could rely on that had substance to be able to make a contribution, as a teacher.

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And.

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That's how it started.

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And I still to this day, read every single day, seven days a week I'm

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reading and I'm writing and I'm speaking seven days a week pretty well.

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so that was my dream to travel the world.

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Go to every country in the face of the earth, share information that I felt

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could be a value in maximizing human awareness potential and help people

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live extraordinary and inspired lives.

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That was my dream because I felt the night I met the gentleman that

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inspired me that what he did for me, I'd like to do for others.

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So that's been my mission.

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I've been on a mission 51 years now.

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November will be 51 years and I do it every day and I can't think of

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anything else I'd rather be doing.

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So that's why I'm a teacher, researcher, writer and traveler.

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I'm so glad I asked the question that way, because I think

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it gave you, it, first of all, it gave me a lot of clues into some

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directions I would like for us to go.

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And one of the, we've got a number of themes here at Seek Go Create,

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and one of these is just this.

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This aspect of redefining what success means and the question that came to

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me as you were just talking I want to ask this because i'm intrigued by it.

Tim Winders:

It sounds as if you were Forced out of the traditional education system At some

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point and is that the right word forced would that be a okay way of saying it,

Tim Winders:

Dr. John Demartini: Yeah.

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The teacher, yeah, I ended up dropping out and leaving school.

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And, I'm grateful for that because I wish I could meet the teacher that

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told me I would never read, write or communicate, but she was up in age when I

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was in first grade, never saw her again.

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So I would thank her because she actually created the void that became the values.

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And, yeah, I was, I didn't have to, I didn't get entrenched in the drone

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training that many people get entrenched in and become part of the sheep.

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I, When I was living on the streets, I got to meet some

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amazing people that were different.

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And I'm very grateful for those experiences.

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I even met Howard Hughes when I was 14 years old.

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So these are the type of, I met all kinds of characters, Timothy Leary.

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And a lot of rock and roll leaders, band leaders.

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I met some interesting characters living on the street.

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So it was a different beat, it wasn't the mainstream thinking process.

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And I'm grateful that I have that because I think that opened up a doorway to

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ask new sets of questions that most people never take the time to ask.

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And the thing I guess that fascinates me about that is

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that both my parents were educators.

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So I'm not anti our education system that we have in first

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world or the United States.

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However, it seems as if there's a path that people go down that

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stay within that education system.

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And it's usually towards specialization, it's usually toward a certain

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definition of what success looks like, which is one of the things we

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attempt to bust up a little bit here.

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And it sounds as if.

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You were moved out of it and it led you down this fascinating path.

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Give me the ages again.

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When did you leave the school system or when were you, when did

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you decide to leave or whatever?

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And then when did you meet this gentleman that had such a big impact on your future?

Tim Winders:

Dr. John Demartini: When I was 13, I, left home.

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I became a street kid.

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At 14, I, I hitchhiked.

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from Houston, Texas, from Freeport, Houston, because I was at the

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beach all the time, to California.

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And I lived in Huntington beach up and down the Southern California area.

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And then down into Mexico, I snuck into Mexico illegally.

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They didn't have a wall yet and, got in and out of there without

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ever getting any paperwork, but I just wanted to go surfing.

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And, it was, this is in the sixties.

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So this was along here at hippie surfer type days.

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And I panhandled enough money in Huntington beach

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to get a flight to Hawaii.

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It was 86 bucks in those days.

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And then I was over there and I lived under a bridge and then

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in a park bench and then a park bathroom and an abandoned car.

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And then I finally kept social climbing and got into a tent.

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And, so I was, that was all the way until 17 and right almost to 18.

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And I met this teacher, right a week before my 18th birthday.

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And in one night, one hour, one man just absolutely blew the socks off

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me and made me think differently.

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he said that we, what we think about, what we visualize, what we

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affirm, what we feel and what we take actions on, determine our destiny.

Tim Winders:

And that, you want to set goals for yourself, your family, your

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community, your city, your state, your nation, your world and beyond

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for 100, 120 years and start living by design instead of living by duty.

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most people are deontologic and living by duty and doing what everybody

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else thinks they should be doing and living by imperatives instead

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of living by indicatives and going after what they really dream about and

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organizing and prioritizing your life.

Tim Winders:

That was a major breakthrough for me.

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I, nobody told me that.

Tim Winders:

I just, and I decided that I was going to figure out a way of, learning how to read.

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I used to have people read to me.

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So the thing that's interesting, cause, and this is so

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appropriate because human motivation is one of the foundations that I

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read as I did some study on you, were you desiring and craving to get

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out of the situation you were in?

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were you someone who just, was it total happenstance

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that you bumped into this guy?

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Was there a divine guidance that was going on, some spiritual thing?

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I'm.

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I'm sure you put thought into it because it's actually been

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catalytic for your entire career.

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Dr. John Demartini: I was expanding my consciousness through all kinds of

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ah, so now we have some clues.

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You said it was the sixties, right?

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Dr. John Demartini: Yeah.

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I, I was doing the magic mushrooms and I was doing the love service and

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dedication and I was doing all the things that would add color to life.

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And I nearly died.

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I ended up having, let's put it this way.

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I really died.

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I was surfing a very big wave and I nearly died.

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And, I ended up passing out in a parking lot, passed out in a parking lot.

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and was next thing I knew, three years, three and a half days

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later, I found myself in my tent.

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So somehow I remember how I got there, but somebody put me

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in my, they knew where I was.

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And then, a lady found me in the tent and helped me clean up the tent.

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Cause it was, I had a catharsis without knowing it while I was unconscious.

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And, She helped clean it up and took me to a health food store where I

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met this Afro guy that looked like Jimi Hendrix, this albino Afro guy.

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And he looked at me and he saw me with these spasms because I had a lot of

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spasms from material that I'd taken.

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And, he said, you need to take a yoga class, man, and learn

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how to have mind over body.

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So I saw on this little Vigor health food store in Haleiwa,

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Hawaii on the North shore.

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I saw this little flyer and said, Paul C.

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Bragg, special guest speaker at so and so yoga class.

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And I knew the word yoga.

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I could see word yoga.

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And I knew that word.

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And, something said go there.

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So I went to a yoga class, and I wasn't taking yoga, I was not into

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meditation or anything like that at that time, but that night, when he

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spoke, was inspiring, and he took us through this guided imagery meditation

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experience where I saw a vision.

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And, that vision is still with me.

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I, if you would like, I can show it to you.

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Yeah.

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It'd be fascinating during that.

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Yeah.

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For those that are watching video, there might be some people listening

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to audio, but we do have this on video, so that'll be fascinating.

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so you did go through some, was it, did you have a near death experience or

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was it a, you almost died experience?

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It's hard to say.

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Dr. John Demartini: I don't know if I would have died.

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I didn't go into a death.

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I don't know.

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I was just unconscious.

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I have no idea.

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I was in a tent by myself, unconscious for three and a half days.

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Somebody found me cause I heard me came out of, I made noise.

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Apparently she found me, this lady in the jungle.

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The reason why,

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Dr. John Demartini: I can find this.

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you know, while you're looking for that, the

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reason I bring that up is that, my father passed away last December.

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My wife's mother is, her health is not great.

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And my wife recently has gotten on a kick of reading a lot of

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books on near death experience.

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She's really been studying.

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It's something we discussed quite a bit.

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and from us as followers of Christ and Christians, we

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were always fascinated with.

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The what afterlife and eternity and things like that.

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And so that's why I was curious if, but it sounds like

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Dr. John Demartini: I didn't have, I didn't have this

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mystical spiritual experience.

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I

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no walk into the light, but you were close

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Dr. John Demartini: I didn't see, no,

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to

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Dr. John Demartini: I was surfing.

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A very big wave is about 40 foot.

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And I went over the falls and my board was smashed and I was.

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I didn't think I was going to make it.

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I found up, up onto the beach.

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I came into, I hitchhiked into Haleiwa, went into an IGA supermarket and had this

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unbelievable strange thing for buttermilk.

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I never drank buttermilk in my life, but I went and just grabbed it and started

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guzzling it right out of the thing.

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And then I started getting dizzy and I passed out in the

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front of the IGA supermarket there on the Kamehameha highway.

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somebody's going to think that buttermilk is

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the secret to all of this.

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They're going to go, Oh my gosh, it's buttermilk.

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I just want to make sure that people know, I don't, we don't think it's

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Dr. John Demartini: this is the vision.

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This is the vision I saw that night.

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Fascinating.

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So you're up on a podium, looks like in some form of an international setting with

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Dr. John Demartini: it's called, it's a painting by Andrew Tisker.

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What happened was, I was speaking in Melbourne, Australia, about

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maybe 1, 600 people, 1, 500 people, something like that.

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And, I was telling a story about the journey.

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They asked me about it, and I told them the story about

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how I got into being speaking.

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And in the back of the room was this artist, and he came forward

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and he says, I was inspired and brought to tears by your story.

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And I said, thank you.

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And he said, I would like to paint it.

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I'd like to paint what you said.

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And he, as a gift, painted that.

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And the name of the painting is a man on a mission with a vision and a message.

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And it's got an iconic building from every major city around

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the world in the background.

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And it's about sharing a message to the world.

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And he took a picture of me the way I looked at the time he did it.

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It was not when I was 17, but he put that picture in front of it.

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But I said that I envisioned myself on this balcony speaking

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to people as far as I could see.

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And it was probably some delusion at the time, but that's what I saw.

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So I shared what I saw and he painted it and it sits in my office.

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It's a five foot by four foot painting.

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It's a magnificent painting that he sent and sent as a gift to my office.

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He's a famous painter in Australia.

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Wow.

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Fascinating.

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And I love when we get glimpses from visions and things like that, but

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how, give me some timeframes here.

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So you had that situation, you had that vision, and then you.

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You began reading.

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It sounds like you began consuming and gathering information.

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At what point did you begin seeing that manifest?

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Like you were in front of other people doing some things.

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I'm sure you weren't in front of thousands immediately, but.

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Progression.

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Dr. John Demartini: When I was 18 years old, I was studying in a library

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at this Wharton Junior College.

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That's the only place I could get started back to school.

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I couldn't go to a university.

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I had to take a GED, high school equivalency test, to get in.

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And I failed my first class in school and almost gave up.

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And I remember crying because I got a 27.

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Everybody else had 75 or higher and I got a 27 and I really was crying and I

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was driving home and I said, All I could hear was my first grade teacher, what she

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said to me, you'll never be able to read or write, never be able to communicate,

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never amount to anything in life.

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And I came home and I curl up in a fetal position underneath this Bible stand

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that my mom had in the living room.

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And she came home from shopping and she saw me crying and she said,

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what happened son, what's wrong?

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I said, I worked, I thought I was going to pass.

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I got a 27.

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I didn't even come close.

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and, she looked at me and she got quiet for a second.

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Then she put her hand on my shoulder and she said, son, whether you become a

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great teacher and healer and philosopher and travel the world like you dream,

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or whether you go back to Hawaii and ride giant waves or you return to the

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streets and panhandle as a bum, which you've done, I just want to let you

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know that your father and I are going to love you no matter what, just love you.

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When she said that, my hand went into a fist.

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I looked up and I saw that vision again.

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The night I met Paul Bragg, I saw that vision.

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And I said to myself, I'm going to amass this thing called

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reading, studying, and learning.

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I'm going to amass this thing called teaching and philosophy and healing.

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And I'm going to do whatever it takes.

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I'm going to travel whatever distance.

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I'm going to pay whatever price to get my source of love across this planet.

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I'm not going to let any human being stop me, not even myself, nothing.

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It was a no turning back moment.

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And I hugged my mom.

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I went into my room.

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I got a Funkin Wagnalls dictionary.

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Cause you, if you bought 20 worth of food at Kroger, you got an extra volume

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of an encyclopedia in a dictionary.

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And I got this dictionary out and I made a commitment to memorize the dictionary.

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And I did 30 words a day until that dictionary was in my head.

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And that allowed me, and I started reading encyclopedia, eight complete

Tim Winders:

sets of encyclopedia, Americana, Britannica, and all those things,

Tim Winders:

popular science, book of knowledge.

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I read eight of those just to grow my vocabulary.

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So I would be able to catch up with everybody else.

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And, then what about, I, when I was, I went to back to school

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and now I'm starting to pass.

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I really grew fast from that.

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And then This lady found me in the library cause she saw me in the library every day.

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And she came up to me and she says, can you teach me what you're doing?

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And I was doing yoga at the time.

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And so my first student, I taught a little yoga too.

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The second student wanted me to teach a meditation.

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Then 17 students came out and asked me to teach mathematics.

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And that grew.

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Then when I left that school and I went to the University of Houston, I

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used to do my meditation and yoga out under the trees and people gathered.

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And I'd have a hundred, 125, 150, 400 people.

Tim Winders:

every day under the trees unless it was raining.

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And then we went to the cafeteria and they'd come there.

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And I started having a following and a gathering starting at by age 20.

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And then when I went to professional school, I had students every

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single night I was teaching.

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And I was teaching, I was going around the city and the state, and now

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I've been to 194 countries speaking.

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So I just never stopped, and I'm still going.

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you moved into that role of teacher trainer, someone

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who shares information very quickly.

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There's one thing you said that I want to go back before we jump ahead to where

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we are now and start getting into the Demartini method and things like that.

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And I read somewhere, I don't know if it was a topic on one of, on your

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podcast or something on your website, you were talking about the word love.

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and this is I'll quote to quote Huey Lewis, the power of love.

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I don't think that's the exact wording you used, but.

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when you just said your mother told you that her and her father were going to

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love you regardless, that's what popped in my head, literally the power of love.

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And then I was taken back to, and I read some of it, I don't think I listened to

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everything on your site, but you obviously talk about love and what a catalyst it is.

Tim Winders:

And obviously it's foundational to, a lot of world religions and,

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thoughts of people with a creator and God, and, but this was parental.

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Sounds like unconditional as we can be as humans.

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Talk about that.

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I'll again, Huey Lewis, the power of love, because I think you've recently

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had that on some things you've done and, and how important it was for

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you at that stage in that time.

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Dr. John Demartini: Yeah, I don't think in any of the books that I've published,

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there's a bosom to have love in it.

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I think that's just a standard foundation.

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I don't think of love as...

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an infatuation where you have an impulse from your amygdala to seek

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for procreative purposes only, not a lustful kind of infatuation.

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I think of a love as the embracing of the complementation

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of opposites that's in people.

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if I go up to somebody and I say, you're always nice, you're never mean,

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you're always kind, you're never cruel, you're always positive, never negative,

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always peaceful, never wrathful.

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Do you believe that?

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They'll go, not exactly.

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And they'll be intuitively led to remember things that

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weren't that way, the opposite.

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And I said, you're always mean, you're never nice, you're always

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cruel, you're never kind, you're always negative, never positive.

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They go, no, that's not it.

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And then I say to them, sometimes you're nice, sometimes you're mean, sometimes

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you're kind, sometimes you're cruel, sometimes you're positive, sometimes

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negative, sometimes peaceful, ethical.

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Do you believe that now?

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And they'll go, yes.

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So I believe that everybody has the pairs of opposites.

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Whatever you perceive as a pair of opposites.

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Wilhelm Wundt in 1895, who was the father of experimental psychology, said that

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when you have simultaneous contrast, you have maximum potential and you have love.

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So I'm a believer that love is a synthesis and synchronicity.

Tim Winders:

A simultaneity of all pairs of opposites.

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So whatever you like about somebody, you're going to also get the other side.

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If you're ready for, if you're mature in a marriage, you're going to be

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able to take the and the dislike, the positive and the negative, the

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kind and the cruel, the two sides.

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When you're able to love both sides simultaneously,

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Equally, you now have love.

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And that means the things you like and dislike equally because you see the

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things you like support you and keep you juvenile and dependent and impulsive.

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And the things you dislike makes you precociously more

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independent and more resourceful.

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And you need a combination of those to maximally grow and develop.

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And so those synthesis of those is where I define love as, so I define love as a

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synthesis, synchronicity of all comparing opposites at all scales of existence

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from the subatomic to the astronomic.

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And that's the divine love that we could call it, the universal love, if you want

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to call it that, because it's omnipresent.

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It's at all scales.

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It's in the subatomic particle and antiparticles and it's at the

Tim Winders:

astronomical, black holes and white dwarfs and, it's astronomical levels too.

Tim Winders:

And there's a conservation, a symmetry, an elegant symmetry and mathematical

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conservation at all these scales.

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And I'm a real lover of the science.

Tim Winders:

Of love.

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Cause I really believe there's a science to it.

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And I do my best to in that with the Demartini Method to ask a series

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of questions, to make you conscious of what you're unconscious of.

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So you can be fully conscious and embrace the love that's always present.

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Cause we sometimes overlook the love that's present by holding onto fantasies

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about how life's supposed to be and then honoring, not honoring the whole.

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We're trying to get rid of half of it instead of honoring

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the whole of what life is.

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That'd be like being in a relationship with somebody and saying, I want you to

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get rid of half of yourself and I just want this side, but I want to love you.

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And I'll love you if you do that.

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that's not real love.

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That's a, an infatuation with a fantasy and avoidance of a nightmare, which is

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an animal amygdala response, instead of a heart and higher brain functioning,

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reasonable individual, which I think we all have the capacity to express.

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Yeah, that's a great in depth conversation about a word that

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I've always said is thrown around a little bit too frivolously in our culture

Tim Winders:

society because people love pizza.

Tim Winders:

They love a football team, they love, and you brought up a word mature early

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on when you were having that, when you were discussing that just then, and

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at times, maybe I'll ask it this way, where are we at culturally, because

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at times I see things and I go, you know, I just don't think we're very

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mature people to be able to have the conversations like we're, Attempting

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to have right here, I think people are very immature, their feelings and

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emotions driven, which I know you address that with some of the things you do.

Tim Winders:

and I guess the way I want to pose the question and then we'll start

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sliding into some of the methods and some of the, the applications and all

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that you can provide for us, where are we at as a society and a culture?

Tim Winders:

Because there are times and I want to share this.

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This is a little bit transparent on my part.

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I at times can be extremely optimistic about future,

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spiritually, I have an eternal mindset, different things like that.

Tim Winders:

And then at times I can be extremely disappointed and

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disheartened by things I see.

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And I'm an executive coach.

Tim Winders:

I work with leaders and there's some things I work with

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that are extremely positive.

Tim Winders:

And then some things that are extremely challenging.

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Just respond, where are we at culturally?

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Are we doing, yay, great, thumbs up, we're a 10 out of 10, or ooh, we got

Tim Winders:

problems, or somewhere in between.

Tim Winders:

Dr. John Demartini: it fluctuates.

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And I think that we're temporarily.

Tim Winders:

fling in our amygdala right now, highly polarized.

Tim Winders:

And, if I look at myself, 39 years ago, I did an experiment.

Tim Winders:

I noticed that whatever I was saying to somebody was also for me.

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I noticed whatever I was saying about somebody was also a reflection of me.

Tim Winders:

And instead of waiting for people to push my buttons, I decided to do a preemptive

Tim Winders:

strike and to look in a dictionary.

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I got the Oxford English Dictionary, it was the biggest dictionary I could find.

Tim Winders:

And, Went through and underlined every word that described

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a human behavioral trait.

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Because that's my real specialty, if you want to call it a specialty.

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And I found 4, 628 traits.

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I itemized them out.

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There was a guy named Gordon Alport that did something similar.

Tim Winders:

He found a thousand, but there's probably some more words since he had done that.

Tim Winders:

And then what I did is I went out to the side of where that word was.

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And I wrote out, who do I know that expresses that

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trait to the greatest degree?

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Just put a little initial there that I knew of.

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And then I went into my life and I said, all right, John, where and

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when, Do I perceive myself displaying or demonstrating that particular

Tim Winders:

trait, that action or that inaction, and keep identifying where it was,

Tim Winders:

who is it to, and who perceived me that way until I could own that I

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had it as much as I saw in these individuals that were the most extreme.

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And I realized that I had all 4, 628 traits.

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I was nice and mean and kind and cruel and positive and negative and peaceful

Tim Winders:

and wrathful and considerate and inconsiderate and honest and dishonest.

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And I had every one of those traits in my own way of expressing it.

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Not the way everybody else does because they have a unique set

Tim Winders:

of values filtering how they do it, but I'm doing the behavior.

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And that made me realize that the buttons we have in life that we react

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to people with seeking or avoiding or admiration or despise are nothing

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more than the disowned parts of ourselves that they're reminding us of.

Tim Winders:

That we're too proud or too humble to admit that we see in them,

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but we don't, we're too proud and humble to admit that we have it.

Tim Winders:

So I didn't want to wait to have to go through the learning process and have the

Tim Winders:

wisdom of the ages with the aging process.

Tim Winders:

I want to go dig deeper and find out where I already had those.

Tim Winders:

And that was enormously resourceful because it calmed down a lot of my

Tim Winders:

impulsive subjective bias and judgments on people and putting people on pedestals or

Tim Winders:

pits instead of putting them in my heart.

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And I just realized they're just human beings and they're all worth

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putting in my heart, but none of them are worth putting on pedals or fits.

Tim Winders:

I learned that.

Tim Winders:

And I met some really amazing people.

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I met 9, 000 world celebrities.

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and I, some of them, you think, Oh, these are amazing.

Tim Winders:

They're just human beings.

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And there's nothing they've got that we don't have.

Tim Winders:

I teach people how to own the traits of the greats.

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Take people that you think are heroes and villains and find out

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where you have all that in you.

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And the moment you do, instead of judging them, They're only reminding you of

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the things you haven't loved in you.

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I think it was in Romans 2.

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1, it has a statement in there, be beware of judging because what you judge is you.

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And that's true.

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I found that to be true.

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We only resent things in other people that remind us of something we feel

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ashamed of and we're dissociated from it by being addicted to pride to cover it.

Tim Winders:

And when they were reminding it by these people, they're pushing our

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buttons and they're trying to teach us how to go back and love that part.

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And they're our teacher, not our enemy.

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And the same thing for the admired part.

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We're just too humble to admit it, but we have that trait too.

Tim Winders:

Nothing's missing in us.

Tim Winders:

I've said at the level of the soul, which is the state of unconditional

Tim Winders:

love, nothing's missing in us.

Tim Winders:

At the level of our senses, things appear to be missing in us.

Tim Winders:

And the things that appear to be missing in us are all the things we're

Tim Winders:

too proud or too humble to admit that we have, that we see in other people.

Tim Winders:

And so reflective awareness is the key to intimacy and true love.

Tim Winders:

We realize that the seer, the seeing and the seen is the same, whatever

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you perceive in others, you have.

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Now you can actually love that individual because you're not

Tim Winders:

putting them above you or below you.

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They're not on pedestals or pits, they're in your heart.

Tim Winders:

And that love, is profoundly impactful and helps transform

Tim Winders:

relationships, transform business.

Tim Winders:

See, if you're too proud, you go into narcissism, you try to get something

Tim Winders:

for nothing, which is non sustainable.

Tim Winders:

And if you minimize yourself and put them on a pedestal and you disown

Tim Winders:

that, you try to sacrifice for others.

Tim Winders:

But if you have sustainable fair exchange by having equanimity within

Tim Winders:

yourself and equity between yourself and others, you now have the love that

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actually maximizes human potential.

Tim Winders:

And when you're looking down on people, you're trying to change

Tim Winders:

them into you, which is futile.

Tim Winders:

When you're looking up at people, you're trying to change

Tim Winders:

you into them, which is futile.

Tim Winders:

Instead of being you and allowing them to be them, you have futility.

Tim Winders:

And that's when your will is now not matching what has been called in

Tim Winders:

theology is divine will, the way it is.

Tim Winders:

And you're now fighting the universe.

Tim Winders:

But when you actually love and have equanimity, there's no fight.

Tim Winders:

And now you're in the flow, you're in the zone, you're in the, you're

Tim Winders:

in a state of grace on life and you're appreciative of life.

Tim Winders:

And I'm interested in helping people maximize that.

Tim Winders:

where they match and they empower themselves in their body.

Tim Winders:

I could go for hours on how that affects physiology and epigenetics

Tim Winders:

and autonomic regulation.

Tim Winders:

and, it does amazing things in business development.

Tim Winders:

It does amazing things in financial development, cause you can't manage money

Tim Winders:

if you've got emotions all over the place.

Tim Winders:

You can manage it when you're objective and strategic and you care and serve

Tim Winders:

people with sustainable fair exchange.

Tim Winders:

You build businesses and build wealth that way.

Tim Winders:

All areas of life are enhanced through love.

Tim Winders:

So that's why I'm, I can go for weeks, nonstop, on the significance of what love

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really represents in human consciousness.

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Something that I really, all of that was extremely powerful, but

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you brought up judging, and I'll even use a more common word, which is judgment.

Tim Winders:

Let's just call it comparison.

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You're judging or comparing yourself to others.

Tim Winders:

And, one of the more powerful statements that I think we repeat that Jesus

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use was judge not lest ye be judged.

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And we say that we throw it around in church world.

Tim Winders:

It's thrown around all the time, but I don't know that people grasp it.

Tim Winders:

I think with our social media and things like that, it is way too

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easy to compare ourselves to others.

Tim Winders:

And you brought it up.

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There's some people.

Tim Winders:

That compare themselves and see themselves as less.

Tim Winders:

Some people compare themselves as, see themselves as more than others.

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and I love the thought of even, it's another word that we've messed up

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in our culture, which is equality.

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we are as equals as creation.

Tim Winders:

And I love that you said all of these, I think, characteristics

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are really in all of us, the way we're built and formed and created.

Tim Winders:

And so I guess my question related to that is, how do we, first of all, break

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away from that situation of judging or comparison to get in a mode of focusing

Tim Winders:

on self and see, this is where a lot of people get uncomfortable when we start

Tim Winders:

getting into, religion on us, because you're not supposed to focus on yourself.

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how do we look at ourselves enough for that?

Tim Winders:

To start applying the methods, you're about to share some things that,

Tim Winders:

that will be helpful for us so that we could then get in the mindset of

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wanting to learn some of these things.

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Because some people don't even want to go down the path.

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I think they wouldn't be here at the 40th minute mark of the podcast

Tim Winders:

if they weren't in that mode.

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But let's just pretend that people are not even getting over that

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hump to even want to go further.

Tim Winders:

Farther to really, uncover some of these things.

Tim Winders:

What are some things related to that?

Tim Winders:

And then let's start diving into some things that you want to

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teach us that we need to know.

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Dr. John Demartini: anytime we're too proud or too humble to

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admit that we have what we see in others, we have disowned parts.

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Now I've taken personally over 150, 000 people through my method And I

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have 7, 000 facilitators and I've taken thousands of people through.

Tim Winders:

So it's millions now of helping people realize that whatever you see in others

Tim Winders:

is you, which is a biblical statement.

Tim Winders:

And it goes even before biblical writings.

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it's a very ancient Sumerian and Egyptian and Greek, and

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it goes all the way through.

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We can find references to it everywhere.

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So we ask the question, what specific trait, action or inaction, do I

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perceive this individual displaying or demonstrating that I admire

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most or I might despise most, that I've got on a pedestal or a pit?

Tim Winders:

And then once I identify what that trait, action, or interaction, and then ask,

Tim Winders:

okay, go to a moment, me, myself, where and when I display that same benefit.

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Or that same trait that I admire or despise, the same,

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where do I do the same action?

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I do the same, just like in Romans says.

Tim Winders:

then once you go and honestly answer that, and people are too proud to admit

Tim Winders:

they have that or too humble to admit they have that sometimes, cause when

Tim Winders:

they're looking down, they're too proud.

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If they're looking up, they're too humble.

Tim Winders:

But when they actually go and discover that it brings tears to their eyes

Tim Winders:

because they've been repressing their awareness in the unconscious and storing

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that imbalance in their subconscious.

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And it feels empty.

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Every time you disown a part that you see in others, you feel empty.

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All judgment leaves you feeling empty.

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You cannot feel fulfilled with judgment, but love when you embrace

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both sides simultaneously is fulfilling.

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The Gnostics in the second century called it pleroma,

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fullness, and kenoma, emptiness.

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And the second we identify where we do that to the same degree, quantitatively,

Tim Winders:

qualitatively, and then go in there and find out the trait we think is small.

Tim Winders:

Many of the things we think is terrible a day, a week, a month, a year, or

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five years later, we go look back and go, thank God that happened.

Tim Winders:

And some of the things we think are terrific, like that new house or

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whatever, that new car or whatever, Days, weeks, months, years, labor, that

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freaking house, we find the downsides to.

Tim Winders:

So why have the wisdom of the ages with the aging process?

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Why not have the wisdom of the ages without it by looking

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for both sides simultaneously and becoming present with it?

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Because otherwise it's going to activate an impulse in your amygdala or an instinct

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in your amygdala to seek or avoid and the external world extrinsically runs you.

Tim Winders:

Instead of you running you, the core of you is love.

Tim Winders:

If you're a Christian, that's what Christ is about, right there,

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that, not the judgment, that.

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The reflective awareness, pure reflective awareness is true

Tim Winders:

intimacy and where human will matches divine will, where the paradox of

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predestination and free will join.

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Cause now you realize there's nothing to change in me relative to others.

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There's nothing to change in others relative to me.

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I have nothing to fix.

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Nothing's out of order.

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I'm now aware of the divine magnificence.

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I'm seeing the order of the universe at that moment.

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And that place is grace and it brings tears of inspiration.

Tim Winders:

And what's interesting is when we get supported by people, we admire

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our parasympathetic goes online.

Tim Winders:

When we get challenged with fight or flight, our sympathetic goes online.

Tim Winders:

But when they come into perfect balance, we get an autonomic regulation.

Tim Winders:

We get a heart rate variability that maximizes.

Tim Winders:

We have no fear of losing something, no fear of gaining anything.

Tim Winders:

We're not in philias and phobias.

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We're in the present.

Tim Winders:

And in that state, there's a synchronicity in the brain between

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the beta waves and the Delta waves.

Tim Winders:

And there's a gamma synchronicity and there's a whole brain function.

Tim Winders:

The heart opens.

Tim Winders:

And that is real physiology.

Tim Winders:

I can demonstrate that, reproduce that, guarantee that action.

Tim Winders:

And by holding people accountable, by asking quality questions, which

Tim Winders:

is what the Demartini Method's about, to asking quality questions that

Tim Winders:

equilibrate the mind and liberate them from the emotional entanglement of the

Tim Winders:

infatuation, resentments of judgments that they've got people in pedestal pits

Tim Winders:

that are holding them back from doing something extraordinary in their lives.

Tim Winders:

So I believe that's what.

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From a Christian perspective, and I think that's what Christ

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was trying to say, is that love, that form of love, is liberating.

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And that's the one that is being represented.

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We have all kinds of different throwing around the word love, but that's

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the love that I'm talking about.

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that right there is something.

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And probably the only time we have that is when we're zero to one years old.

Tim Winders:

We can pee, we can poo, we can, bite and chew and throw things that

Tim Winders:

first year until they stand up.

Tim Winders:

Once they stand up, no.

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Yes.

Tim Winders:

Yes.

Tim Winders:

Now all the moral hypocrisies that we trap ourselves and other

Tim Winders:

people with start to pick up.

Tim Winders:

But right before that, we have an unconditional love, and that child

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gets that maybe the first year.

Tim Winders:

Most of the time it picks up all kind of judgments after that, and has to work its

Tim Winders:

way, as Kohlberg says, we have to work our way eventually into our midlife crisis

Tim Winders:

before we finally reach the point where we no longer, and we've transcended all

Tim Winders:

the people's judgments that are blocking us from being able to love people.

Tim Winders:

the

Tim Winders:

Yeah, I absolutely agree with that.

Tim Winders:

I'm a grandfather and I've got a three year old and a one year old and there

Tim Winders:

is something that comes over me when I interact with those girls or both girls.

Tim Winders:

and I'm in agreement with you.

Tim Winders:

There is something that, if I'm doing business with you and all

Tim Winders:

that, we may have some, back and forth and all that, but with them.

Tim Winders:

unconditional, there is nothing that they can do wrong.

Tim Winders:

And it's fascinating.

Tim Winders:

What I'd love to do here, there are leaders listening in.

Tim Winders:

There are people that run businesses, there's people that

Tim Winders:

run ministries and people that are associated with those things.

Tim Winders:

And the Demartini method, I know has, there's a lot to it.

Tim Winders:

And so we Probably have 10 minutes ish or so.

Tim Winders:

I would love for us, and I hope this isn't tough.

Tim Winders:

If it's not doable, let me know.

Tim Winders:

I'd love for us to do somewhat of an introduction so that people can get a

Tim Winders:

grasp of what they're talking about.

Tim Winders:

And then we'll finish up with how they can get more info.

Tim Winders:

Cause I know you've got lots of books, trainings, different things like that.

Tim Winders:

So is that possible and doable here?

Tim Winders:

Because what I'd love to do, I think we have.

Tim Winders:

Tilled the soil and given story and all enough so that people that are

Tim Winders:

listening in are going to want to know, all right, I want a little bit

Tim Winders:

more, how can I get some more info?

Tim Winders:

So whichever direction you want to go, but I love, I'd love for us to get a little

Tim Winders:

bit more into the Demartini method so that people know a little bit about what they

Tim Winders:

might could find if they keep going after they listened in on this conversation.

Tim Winders:

Dr. John Demartini: Demartini Method started, it wasn't called that initially.

Tim Winders:

I, when I was 19 years old, 18 going on 19, my mom said, what

Tim Winders:

do you want for your birthday?

Tim Winders:

And for Christmas?

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Cause I was born on Thanksgiving day.

Tim Winders:

I said, mom, I want the greatest teachings on the face of the earth by

Tim Winders:

the greatest writers who've ever lived around the world, from around the world.

Tim Winders:

She said, you sure you don't want a t shirt?

Tim Winders:

I said, no mom.

Tim Winders:

She contacted her brother, which was my uncle Ralph.

Tim Winders:

And he was a professor at MIT.

Tim Winders:

He was a physicist and chemist.

Tim Winders:

And he sent me Two giant six by six foot wooden crates of textbooks.

Tim Winders:

It was the best gift I probably ever had in my life, other than children, but

Tim Winders:

they were sent on a big flatbed truck.

Tim Winders:

And I went out on a crowbar, they put them on the ground and I'll open it with

Tim Winders:

a crowbar and filled my room with books.

Tim Winders:

One of the books was by Leibniz, the German philosopher,

Tim Winders:

Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz.

Tim Winders:

The Discourse on Metaphysics.

Tim Winders:

And in that book at the very beginning, he said that there's a perfection in the

Tim Winders:

universe that few people ever get to see.

Tim Winders:

And no human being could improve upon it.

Tim Winders:

And Voltaire satired him with Candide and attacked him for that.

Tim Winders:

But Voltaire did not really understand what he was saying.

Tim Winders:

But Leibniz said that there's a higher order.

Tim Winders:

Bohm called it an implicate order, but there's a higher order there that we just

Tim Winders:

don't, our Wolfram, the mathematician called it computational boundaries.

Tim Winders:

We don't have the capacity to comprehend the hidden order that's

Tim Winders:

in the reality that we have.

Tim Winders:

And we go around and we judge something and have a random perspective,

Tim Winders:

which means missing information, according to Claude Shannon.

Tim Winders:

So I basically started out on a quest to find the hidden order.

Tim Winders:

Now, I'd also got a book from him from 1947, by the principles

Tim Winders:

of quantum mechanics by Paul Dirac, the Nobel prize winner.

Tim Winders:

Not an easy book to read when you first started learning to read, but

Tim Winders:

I got dictionaries out and I started taking every word I didn't understood.

Tim Winders:

I just started, kept reading it and using the dictionary.

Tim Winders:

But in there, he said for every particle, there's an antiparticle.

Tim Winders:

And if you join them together, you make light.

Tim Winders:

if you take light and put it in a bubble chamber, you can separate

Tim Winders:

the particle and antiparticles.

Tim Winders:

And I thought in my naivety, what an amazing metaphor.

Tim Winders:

If I was to take positive and negative emotions and I was to put them

Tim Winders:

together, could I make enlightenment?

Tim Winders:

Could I make love?

Tim Winders:

Cause to me, enlightenment and love are the same, love and light.

Tim Winders:

I think that's what they said in John in the new Testament, Christ was light.

Tim Winders:

There's a message there and it was love.

Tim Winders:

So that started me on a journey at age 18, going on 19, for the method.

Tim Winders:

And the method is been developing since for 50 years now.

Tim Winders:

And it is basically everything I can get my hands on in every field I can

Tim Winders:

get my hands on to try to compose.

Tim Winders:

a series of questions that make us conscious of what we're unconscious

Tim Winders:

of, so we can be fully conscious.

Tim Winders:

Because a fully conscious individual sees both sides simultaneously.

Tim Winders:

And the moment they do, they're graced.

Tim Winders:

And there's a reproducible state.

Tim Winders:

I can take anybody to a state where they're speechless with tears of

Tim Winders:

gratitude, where they see the hidden order and there's nothing except thank you, real

Tim Winders:

gratitude, not thank you superficially, but thank you for seeing both the

Tim Winders:

support, the challenge, the positive, the negative, both sides simultaneously.

Tim Winders:

I see it.

Tim Winders:

I see the way the universe is working for me now.

Tim Winders:

And so the method is a series of very concise questions to make you conscious

Tim Winders:

of information you've been overlooking and unconscious of, that is keeping you

Tim Winders:

in bondage emotionally with judgments and infatuation, resentments, and grief, and

Tim Winders:

all the stuff that baggage that people run their life by, because anything you

Tim Winders:

infatuate with or resent occupies space and time in your mind and runs you.

Tim Winders:

And so all that stuff, We have all of a sudden a clear consciousness where there's

Tim Winders:

nothing there except tears of grace.

Tim Winders:

And we see that perfection.

Tim Winders:

The method is designed to help people see the perfection of their

Tim Winders:

life so they can actually start to live from an authentic place.

Tim Winders:

If you exaggerate yourself, you're not authentic.

Tim Winders:

If you minimize yourself, you're not authentic.

Tim Winders:

It's only when you're being yourself that you're authentic.

Tim Winders:

And when you're authentic, That's when you're having the Holy Communion.

Tim Winders:

That's when you're actually present.

Tim Winders:

That's when I define it as the Christ consciousness.

Tim Winders:

That's when you really have it.

Tim Winders:

We can hypocritically go around and say, yeah, I'm a Christian or whatever.

Tim Winders:

But people, when they ask me if I'm a Christian, I said, only in that moment.

Tim Winders:

The rest of it's my hypocrisy.

Tim Winders:

In that moment, I'm a Christian.

Tim Winders:

The rest of it, I just talk, it's words, it's everything.

Tim Winders:

But in that moment, I am, I'm honoring that state.

Tim Winders:

In that state, that's what the method's for.

Tim Winders:

And that I can show unquestionably, how it empowers every of your life and your

Tim Winders:

mental capacity, how it affects the brain, your business, your finance, your

Tim Winders:

relationship, your social life, your physical health, and your inspiration.

Tim Winders:

All of those are empowered in that state.

Tim Winders:

And so that is my mission, to design methodologies and principles

Tim Winders:

that help people maximize that.

Tim Winders:

and I do that every day.

Tim Winders:

that's the method.

Tim Winders:

And I, there's, I, all the questions and there's lots of questions

Tim Winders:

in it, but they're very precise.

Tim Winders:

And I train people methodically.

Tim Winders:

I'm starting a training tomorrow, in fact, methodically on how to do that.

Tim Winders:

So we have people out there, thousands of them out there, helping

Tim Winders:

people around the world with it.

Tim Winders:

Is it done one on one or is it in group settings?

Tim Winders:

Dr. John Demartini: You can do a one on one or a group setting.

Tim Winders:

I did, I had 750 people in India on Zoom recently, where we were doing the method.

Tim Winders:

And was, imagine 750 people sitting there speechless with

Tim Winders:

tears and snot out of their nose.

Tim Winders:

I don't know how to describe it.

Tim Winders:

You're so grace that there's, you, there's no facade, just you, just

Tim Winders:

grace over something they swore they would never be able to love in life.

Tim Winders:

That's what we were able to do.

Tim Winders:

And that was 750.

Tim Winders:

I'm from India.

Tim Winders:

And we had a translator doing it.

Tim Winders:

So it still worked through translation.

Tim Winders:

and what's fascinating is that it sounds as if this cuts

Tim Winders:

across belief systems, structures, cultures, things like that.

Tim Winders:

One question related to what you were just bringing up that came to mind,

Tim Winders:

this might be a little bit of a negative slant, but do we have Are some of the

Tim Winders:

structures, the organizations that we have in our current society, culture,

Tim Winders:

are they inhibiting people from going to these places we've been talking about?

Tim Winders:

And, whatever structure you want to talk about, government, I think religions,

Tim Winders:

churches, some of the church structures, you would think we would be helping people

Tim Winders:

move along, but I can guarantee you, and I want to say this, With every fiber in

Tim Winders:

me that there are some of my Christian brothers and sisters that are listening

Tim Winders:

in and they're going to be quite offended with some of the language we're using.

Tim Winders:

I'm not because I can see how it lines up with my belief system.

Tim Winders:

But, and there are many church structures and all would say, whoa, yoga.

Tim Winders:

You know what I'm saying.

Tim Winders:

what are

Tim Winders:

Dr. John Demartini: Yoga just means union.

Tim Winders:

Yoga means union and religion.

Tim Winders:

Religion comes from ligation to suture together pairs of opposites.

Tim Winders:

They're the same thing.

Tim Winders:

There's no, there's people, I always say whatever we're not

Tim Winders:

up on, we can get it down on.

Tim Winders:

Whatever we're not knowledgeable about, the more knowledgeable we

Tim Winders:

have the more open we are to life.

Tim Winders:

right.

Tim Winders:

The bigger question is what all is out there that is keeping people, people,

Tim Winders:

we know they don't ask questions.

Tim Winders:

We talked earlier about maturity.

Tim Winders:

We talked about, consciousness and love, and I love that you brought grace into

Tim Winders:

the conversation, but it, there are a lot of things working against that.

Tim Winders:

And government structures and all that.

Tim Winders:

what is your biggest, what's your biggest hurdle in interacting with people?

Tim Winders:

what are you attempting to overcome?

Tim Winders:

Dr. John Demartini: let me.

Tim Winders:

Let me see if I can put it into a context.

Tim Winders:

When you're a young boy or girl, and you're in elementary school,

Tim Winders:

you probably have a science class.

Tim Winders:

And in the front of the class, in the science class, you'll see an atom,

Tim Winders:

hydrogen, then helium, and then lithium, and then beryllium, and then boron and

Tim Winders:

carbon and nitrogen, oxygen, all the way up to iron, and all the way up to uranium.

Tim Winders:

And each will get a little larger.

Tim Winders:

And you'll, in elementary school, swear that an atom is a little ball, a sphere.

Tim Winders:

And so you have little stick pictures with little red balls

Tim Winders:

and white balls and blue balls.

Tim Winders:

You make little models out of it.

Tim Winders:

And you're in your world, you believe that's what an atom is, a little sphere.

Tim Winders:

Then you go to high school and then you get the Bohr model and you find out, no,

Tim Winders:

it's a little solar system looking thing.

Tim Winders:

It's got a proton and a neutron and then it's got electrons going around it.

Tim Winders:

And it's like a solar system.

Tim Winders:

So it makes orbitals and spheres, And so you think, okay, it's a little bit more

Tim Winders:

abstract than the original idea, but I'm ready for that abstraction because

Tim Winders:

I had to take that first abstraction.

Tim Winders:

And then you go to, from high school to college, and then you

Tim Winders:

get introduced, wait a minute now, it's not exactly the Bohr model.

Tim Winders:

It's not exactly an orbital.

Tim Winders:

It's a probability distribution based on complex mathematics, which is a square

Tim Winders:

root of negative one times real numbers.

Tim Winders:

And it's basically a Schrodinger equation on the probability of where

Tim Winders:

that possible electron might be and where these protons and neutrons which

Tim Winders:

are made of mesons and quarks and things are made out of and gluons.

Tim Winders:

So now you realize, wait a minute now, I was taught something

Tim Winders:

here and it's not exactly that.

Tim Winders:

I was taught something here.

Tim Winders:

It's not exactly that.

Tim Winders:

And then you find out, you go towards your PhD and you find out.

Tim Winders:

the probability distribution is based on a point of infinite, infinitesimal

Tim Winders:

point called an electron, which has an infinite energy potential

Tim Winders:

with photons radiating off it.

Tim Winders:

And that has to be renormalized to make it work mathematically.

Tim Winders:

So it's a level of abstraction that goes a little further.

Tim Winders:

And then you realize that, we really don't know.

Tim Winders:

It's this murky field of vibration that's something that we're living

Tim Winders:

at the cornerstone of the mystery of.

Tim Winders:

But I had to teach them the illusion to the ready for truth.

Tim Winders:

And so every level of religious instruction is a different grade in

Tim Winders:

our level of abstraction until we can finally comprehend, if we can comprehend,

Tim Winders:

because our computation capacity is, the real divine magnificence.

Tim Winders:

So each of them are stumbling blocks.

Tim Winders:

But also stepping stones.

Tim Winders:

They're stepping stones, but stumbling blocks.

Tim Winders:

If you've transcended it, you'll see it as Well, that's not exactly true.

Tim Winders:

That's BS.

Tim Winders:

That's an institutional thing that people get attached to.

Tim Winders:

But at the same time, it was a necessary step.

Tim Winders:

As the, in Buddhism, there was an old saying that says, I will teach them the

Tim Winders:

illusion until they're ready for truth.

Tim Winders:

Because if you hit them with the truth too much, it's too abstract.

Tim Winders:

And they go to PhD levels, they can't do that from kindergarten.

Tim Winders:

So I have to teach them in layers.

Tim Winders:

And so I think even in the book of Revelation, There was a mentioning

Tim Winders:

of seven churches, and in the book of revolution it says I have this against

Tim Winders:

thee, I have this against thee, you call yourself Christians, but there

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are these things that you're lukewarm about, and so in the process of doing

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it, they're gradations of Christianity.

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Or gradations of religious instruction.

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In William James book, The Variety of Religious Experiences, it talked

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about those stages and we build layers upon layers, just like our brain.

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we have religious understanding of the amygdala, which is black

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and white and punished and reward.

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And we have higher levels where it's just love.

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And so different people resonate with different stages.

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So I don't want to say it's actually interfering.

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I don't want to say that it's helping.

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It's both.

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It's depending on where you are.

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If you're below it, it's helping.

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If you're beyond it, it seems like it's holding you back.

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It's just a stage of awareness, all teaching people based on

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people's levels of awareness of that magnificence of our universe.

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And part of it's the journey.

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I think I saw some things that you wrote about.

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this is a journey that we're on.

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And that journey is hopefully for people about discovery and moving to that place

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of understanding more about some of the concepts that we've discussed here.

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I do want to ask.

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For how people can really connect with you.

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How can they go a little bit deeper, but I want it.

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I want to ask it in two ways.

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Let's just say someone has been a bit intimidated by some of this conversation.

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There were some names mentioned.

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There were some concepts mentioned that might be a little bit beyond

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the level that they can comprehend.

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So I want you to tell people where to go.

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If they want to start at a simple stage.

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And then the second thing is if someone has been with us, they have

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known most of what you brought up.

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It's been, wow.

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Okay.

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I want to know how to go a bit deeper.

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Tell me some resources, books, something we'll try to

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include all that in the notes.

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But where can people go if they're in one of those?

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Two categories or both those categories,

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Dr. John Demartini: I have classes that are for each of those layers.

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If I'm going on, if I'm going on major television networks, CNN or

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something like that, I have one message.

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Cause you can't go into the deeps of quantum mechanics on there very easily

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without having to water it down a bit.

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If I'm speaking to, university on physics or something like

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that, I'd go to a deeper level.

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So on my website, all that's there.

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So people can just You know, go through and if they were to go to the media

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section, for instance, there are probably 9, 000 radio, television,

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newspapers, magazines, articles, blogs that they can play with.

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All there, it's free.

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It's just right there.

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They can do it.

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They can watch YouTubes, hours and hours of YouTube stuff and just find

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the one that resonates with them.

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Look at the topics that resonate with them and some that don't, I

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don't try to, there's no way you're going to please everybody in life.

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It's not possible.

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So you, There's a spectrum of awareness out there and a

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spectrum of values out there.

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And many people get caught in the idea that my values are

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right and your values are wrong.

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And that's quite immature.

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The whole spectrum of values are necessary.

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You won't even marry somebody with your seven values.

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You're going to find somebody you marry that's going to be doing

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things that are, what's high on your values is low on theirs.

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What's low on theirs, is high on yours, that kind of stuff.

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Cause you're going to delegate stuff to them.

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They're going to delegate stuff to you.

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And that's how it's going to work.

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You're never going to find somebody that's just like you, it'd be the twilight zone.

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So there's a whole spectrum of values.

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They're not right or wrong.

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They're just humans.

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If you can basically look inside yourself with a reflective awareness and find

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out where you have everything they have in your own way and quit denying that,

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You'll liberate yourself and love people.

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And I think that's what the, that's what religion is about to me.

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That's what it's all about to be able to love people and be grateful

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for people and your life and this magnificent place we get to live in.

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All the astronomy that we're doing, we're looking out, we're seeing planets

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in the Goldilocks zone, we're seeing water on these planets, we're seeing all

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these things, they're far distance away.

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But right here on the earth, this is a magnificent place.

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We got an amazing place to live.

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And I think it's wise to be grateful.

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I always say when you're grateful for what you have, you get more to be grateful for.

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And I don't mean gratitude, if it supports your values.

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gratitude, regardless of what happens.

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That's another level of gratitude.

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I would say that the quality of your life is based on the

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quality of the questions you ask.

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If you ask the question, how is, no matter what's happened to

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me, how is it on my divine path?

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How is it on my helping me fulfill my mission and be appreciative of it and

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then use it resourcefully and then grow past the box that we trap ourselves in.

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That's what the website will give you plenty of stuff to be working on.

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You could be working on that, looking on that.

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For a long time, there's plenty there, but just drdemartini.

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com the website, drdemartini.Com.

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I think you'll find my name.

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If you look at my name, you'll find it.

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I think you could search and find that plus there's a podcast and some

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other great resources there We'll include

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Dr. John Demartini: the Demartini show.

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there's, plus there's lots of books and there's movies.

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We've done 50 movies.

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There's all kinds of stuff out there.

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we'll include those in the notes.

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I think it'll be a great resource for people we are Seek go create that's our

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title those three words And i'm gonna ask you to choose one of those other the

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other two just right now that resonates We're not going to get too, you know deep

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here, but seek go or create which word do you choose and why it's my final question

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Dr. John Demartini: I'll take seek because I think that we have innately a yearning

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be, do, and have something extraordinary.

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And we are seeking insights.

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intuitively and through inspiration on how to maximize our contribution

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of sustainable fair exchange with human beings on the planet.

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So all you seek for them.

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Excellent.

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Dr.

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John Demartini, thank you so much for this conversation.

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I have enjoyed it much more than I thought I would, and I was looking forward to it.

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so that says a lot.

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I had high expectations and we exceeded that.

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If you have listened in on this, either via YouTube or One of

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our channels, podcast channels.

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I'm going to ask you to share this episode.

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People need to hear this message.

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I think they need to access some of these resources training.

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So please share this.

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I would greatly appreciate it.

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And I think we'll just help to get this message out.

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So thank you for doing that.

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We have new episodes every Monday until next time continue being

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all that you were created to be.

About the Podcast

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Seek Go Create
Redefining Success in Leadership, Business & Ministry

About your host

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Tim Winders

Tim Winders is a faith driven executive coach and author with over 40 years of experience in leadership, business, and ministry. Through his personal journey of redefining success, he has gained valuable insights on how to align beliefs with work and lead with purpose. He is committed to helping others do the same, running a coaching business that helps leaders, leadership teams, business owners, and entrepreneurs to align their beliefs with their work and redefine success.

In addition to his coaching business, Tim is also the host of the SeekGoCreate podcast and author of the book Coach: A Story of Success Redefined, which provides guidance for those looking to redefine success and align their beliefs with their work. With his extensive background, unique perspective and strengths in strategic thinking, relationship building, and problem-solving, Tim is well-suited to help clients navigate through difficult times and achieve their goals.