full

The Rhythm of Excellence: How Consistent Habits Lead to Extraordinary Results with Patrick Thean

Do you want to achieve consistent success and drive breakthrough growth in your life or organization? Are you searching for the key to establishing a rhythm that leads to success? In this episode, our guest, Patrick Thean, shares his solution for attaining a predictable and sustainable path to success. By following his guidance, you can unlock the power of establishing a harmonious flow that propels you towards your desired outcomes.

"If you want to succeed in anything, you have to get into a rhythm. You have to get into a cadence. You have to do it over and over again, and you have to get better." - Patrick Thean

Access all show and episode resources HERE

About Our Guest:

Get ready to meet Patrick Thean, an individual with a unique perspective on success. A seasoned entrepreneur, Patrick gained recognition as Ernst & Young Entrepreneur of the Year, all thanks to his unique approach and steadfast spirit. Not one to rest on his laurels, he translated his experience into actionable methodologies that help leaders navigate through tumultuous times. His belief in the importance of establishing rhythm tones his successful counsel and has been recognized in his bestselling book.

Reasons to Listen:

  • Master the key principles of establishing consistent routines that drive success.
  • Uncover why accountability matters in goal attainment and how to leverage it for your advantage.
  • Discover your core purpose in life and how to manifest it through your everyday actions.
  • Learn the power of deliberate intentionality and prioritization in crafting effective routines.
  • Explore how to foster a culture of openness and vulnerability that leads to effective leadership.

Key Lessons:

1. Establishing a rhythm is crucial for success in personal and professional life. A consistent rhythm helps build good habits and ensures that important tasks are consistently practiced.

2. Taking ownership of one's time is essential. Rather than being a victim or passively reacting to external circumstances, it is important to accept responsibility for how time is managed.

3. Prioritization is a key aspect of time management. It is important to say no to certain things in order to focus on what truly matters.

4. Self-care is not selfish. Taking care of oneself allows for better service and effectiveness in serving others.

5. Social media and social pressures should not dictate one's life. It is important to be aware of the influence of social media but not be controlled by it.

6. Vulnerability and transparency are crucial in creating a healthy and productive work culture. Leaders should create an environment that rewards vulnerability and reduces judgment.

7. A company should have a structured rhythm and cadence. This includes quarterly planning sessions, weekly adjustment meetings, and a framework for growth and strategy.

8. Success requires consistent habits and deliberate practice. Just like losing weight or running, consistent habits lead to long-term success.

9. Discovering and embracing one's purpose is key to living a fulfilled life aligned with God's plan.

10. Holding high standards and being tough as a leader can lead to better results and growth for employees.

11. Execution is often the problem, not strategy. Ensuring teamwork, alignment, and focus are crucial for success.

12. Accountability means accounting for one's ability and consistently striving towards goals throughout the process.

Overall, the episode highlights the importance of establishing a rhythm, prioritizing effectively, being vulnerable and transparent in leadership, and focusing on execution to achieve success in both personal and professional life.

Resources & Action Steps:

  • Explore the services offered by Patrick Thean and his company, Rhythm Systems, to help CEOs and their teams execute their strategies and achieve their goals.
  • Check out Patrick Thean's book, Rhythm: How to Achieve Breakthrough Execution and Accelerate Growth.
  • Consider implementing a daily micro rhythm, such as taking a few minutes each morning to be grateful, reflect on the previous day, and prioritize your tasks for the day.
  • Start building a rhythm in your own life by establishing habits that support your goals and help you stay focused and accountable.
  • Learn more about the methodology, software, and coaching provided by Rhythm Systems to help companies get focused, aligned, and accountable.
  • Take advantage of the 1010 process mentioned by Patrick Thean to spend time in gratitude, reflection, and prioritization each day.
  • Consider the importance of establishing both rhythms and habits in your personal and professional life to enhance

Episode Highlights:

00:00:00 - Introduction,

Tim Winders introduces the podcast and his guest, Patrick Thean. They discuss the challenges faced by CEOs and the importance of executing strategies for success.

00:02:14 - Helping CEOs Succeed,

Patrick explains his mission to help CEOs succeed by focusing on strategy execution. He emphasizes the difficulty of the CEO role and the high failure rate, emphasizing the need for accountability and commitment to stakeholders.

00:06:22 - Embracing Rhythms,

Patrick discusses the importance of establishing rhythms in both personal and company life. He explains that rhythms help create habits and improve performance, allowing for consistent execution of goals and plans.

00:09:15 - Rhythm vs Habit,

Patrick clarifies the difference between rhythm and habit. He explains that rhythm is a cadence or framework that supports the practice of habits. Rhythm ensures consistency of habits, while habits are specific actions that are repeated regularly.

00:12:10 - Maintaining Rhythm and Habits,

The conversation concludes with a discussion on the challenges of maintaining rhythm and habits. Patrick highlights the need for commitment and rescheduling when disruptions occur, emphasizing the importance of consistent practice for long-term success.

00:13:57 - Importance of Being Intentional,

Being intentional and self-aware helps leaders show up for their team even on days when they feel irritable or grouchy due to lack of sleep or other factors. It may require extra energy and effort, but being intentional about how one carries themselves can lead to success.

00:15:38 - Breaking Barriers to Establishing a Routine,

Some leaders struggle to find time for self-reflection and establishing a morning routine. Two key barriers are not owning one's time and prioritization. Leaders need to accept responsibility for their time and prioritize tasks, saying no more often than yes.

00:19:27 - Overcoming the Misconception of Self-Care,

Leaders, especially servant leaders, may feel guilty for taking time for themselves. However, self-care is essential for being able to effectively serve others. Prioritizing self-care is not selfish, but necessary for maintaining balance and avoiding burnout.

00:22:23 - The Influence of Social Media,

Social media has a powerful influence on people, leading to a fear of judgment and a desire to present a certain image. Leaders need to create a culture that values transparency, vulnerability, and open communication to combat the negative effects of social media.

00:26:19 - The Importance of Vulnerability and Transparency,

Teams cannot reach peak performance without transparency, which requires vulnerability. Creating a culture that encourages open dialogue, resolves conflicts, and embraces mistakes can improve both vulnerability and overall team performance.

00:28:15 - The Myth of Being a Tough Boss,

Patrick discusses the misconception that to be a good boss, one must be tough and not kind. He shares an example from his time in the Singapore military, where he handled a disciplinary situation with kindness and explained the consequences of the soldier's actions.

00:30:41 - Holding Employees Accountable,

Patrick challenges the idea that holding employees accountable for results is seen as being a jerk. He emphasizes the importance of being both tough and kind as a leader, and explains how providing feedback and coaching helps employees improve and grow in their careers.

00:32:21 - The Importance of Direct Feedback,

Patrick highlights the significance of giving direct and timely feedback to employees. He emphasizes that providing constructive criticism and addressing performance issues is not being a jerk, but rather being kind by helping employees identify areas for improvement and grow professionally.

00:33:28 - The Impact of Tough Managers,

Patrick shares his belief that the best managers are those who hold their employees to a higher standard, provide tough feedback, and help them achieve more than they thought possible. He explains that these managers are respected because they push their employees to improve and reach their full potential.

00:37:13 - Embracing Humility and Learning,

Patrick reflects on his early years at Oracle and the importance of having a healthy ego and humility. He shares a personal experience where he embraced feedback from a colleague and used it as an opportunity to learn and improve his programming skills, highlighting the value of humility.

00:41:08 - The Importance of Accountability in Achieving Goals

Patrick discusses how accountability is often misunderstood and misused in organizations. Accountability is not about punishing someone for failure, but rather about helping them achieve their goals by providing support and resources. He emphasizes the importance of early accountability and making adjustments along the way to ensure success.

00:43:00 - The Mindset for Success

Patrick shares his philosophy on success, which is about being curious, learning, being humble, and staying focused. He believes that success is about understanding one's purpose and living it, as well as finding ways to be intentional and reflect on one's actions. He also mentions the importance of rest and allowing God to lead.

00:46:07 - Overcoming Workaholism and Finding Balance

Patrick discusses his family's workaholic tendencies and how he consciously chose not to follow the same path. He emphasizes the importance of discovering one's own purpose and not just blindly following the patterns set by others. He strives to be intentional with his time and prioritize serving his family while still working hard.

00:48:30 - The Power of Rest and Reflection

Patrick explains how he developed a framework called Rhythm that helps leaders reflect, learn, plan, and take intentional action. He believes that taking the time to pause and reflect leads to greater success and prevents burnout. By following a rhythm and allowing God to work through him, he can serve CEOs and help them achieve their goals.

00:55:32 - The Think Rhythm,

Patrick discusses the importance of having a rhythm in work and explains the Think Rhythm, which involves figuring out the key winning moves for growth and prioritizing them above everything else in the company.

00:56:39 - Quarterly Planning and Weekly Adjustment Meetings,

Patrick explains the importance of planning for the quarter and how it is necessary to have a great week to have a great quarter. He introduces the concept of weekly adjustment meetings instead of status meetings, where problems are solved and adjustments are made.

00:58:02 - Fire Prevention Mode vs. Firefighting Mode,

Patrick emphasizes the importance of having a framework and rhythm in place to prevent crises. He suggests that companies should focus on fire prevention mode by having regular weekly meetings to discuss and address issues instead of constantly firefighting.

00:58:47 - Holistic Decision Making,

Patrick advises against impulsively pursuing new opportunities that arise during the quarter. He recommends adding them to the list of things to discuss during the quarterly planning session to make a holistic decision and prioritize effectively.

01:00:45 - AI-Powered Business Coach,

Patrick introduces an AI-powered business coach available on his website. It provides strategic and execution-related advice and helps with goal setting by generating options based on the user's input.

Thank you for listening to Seek Go Create!

Our podcast is dedicated to empowering Christian leaders, entrepreneurs, and individuals looking to redefine success in their personal and professional lives. Through in-depth interviews, personal anecdotes, and expert advice, we offer valuable insights and actionable strategies for achieving your goals and living a life of purpose and fulfillment.

If you enjoyed this episode and found it helpful, we encourage you to subscribe to or follow Seek Go Create on your favorite podcast platform, including Google Podcasts, Apple Podcasts, and Spotify. By subscribing, you'll never miss an episode and can stay up-to-date on the latest insights and strategies for success.

Additionally, please share this episode or what you’ve learned today with your friends, family, and colleagues on your favorite social media platform. By sharing our podcast, you can help us reach more people who are looking to align their faith with their work and lead with purpose.

If you love our podcast and find it valuable, please consider leaving us a 5-star rating and review on your preferred podcast platform. Your review can help us reach more people and inspire them to redefine success in their own lives.

For more updates and episodes, visit our website or follow us on Facebook, Instagram, LinkedIn, Twitter, TikTok and YouTube. We appreciate your support and look forward to helping you achieve your goals and create a life of purpose and fulfillment.

Are you a Faith Driven Leader? Take our quiz to find out! Discover how aligned your faith is with your work and leadership style.

Be all that you were created to be!

Mentioned in this episode:

Unlock Your Leadership Potential with Tim Winders Executive Coaching

Feeling stuck is frustrating, but the path to a breakthrough may be just a discovery call away. Tim Winders, your trusted podcast host, offers transformative coaching sessions that integrate strategic thinking, relationship-building skills, and faith-based principles. Whether you're aiming for revenue growth or more intangible leadership qualities, Tim's coaching approach has a proven history of success. Schedule a free discovery call today and experience the transformation for yourself.

Book Coaching Call

Transcript
Patrick Thean:

When I sold my first company, we were very successful

Patrick Thean:

from the world looking in.

Patrick Thean:

We're very successful.

Patrick Thean:

We're Inc.

Patrick Thean:

500, number 151 on the Inc.

Patrick Thean:

500 list of privately held companies.

Patrick Thean:

We were Entrepreneur of the Year.

Patrick Thean:

We had lots of awards.

Patrick Thean:

But from the inside looking out, I was running from one crisis to another,

Patrick Thean:

solving one problem to another, and then we solved enough to survive,

Patrick Thean:

and every time we survived again, and then suddenly we were successful.

Tim Winders:

Welcome to the Seek Go Create podcast.

Tim Winders:

This is your host, Tim Winders.

Tim Winders:

I'm an executive coach and I get to do one of the things I love the most, which

Tim Winders:

today is interview an incredibly awesome guest, very talented, great background.

Tim Winders:

I do want to remind you, this is Seek Go Create.

Tim Winders:

This is where we challenge the conventional definitions of success.

Tim Winders:

And explore stories of transformation in leadership, business, and in ministry.

Tim Winders:

Today, I have the privilege of interviewing Patrick Tien.

Tim Winders:

He's a seasoned entrepreneur, speaker, CEO, coach, and a best selling author.

Tim Winders:

He's had a remarkable journey that led him to be named Ernst

Tim Winders:

Young Entrepreneur of the Year.

Tim Winders:

He's on a mission to help CEOs build exceptional companies

Tim Winders:

and achieve their dreams.

Tim Winders:

Patrick, welcome to Seek Go Create.

Patrick Thean:

Thank you very much.

Patrick Thean:

I'm so glad to be here.

Patrick Thean:

Thanks for inviting me.

Tim Winders:

Yeah.

Tim Winders:

I'm glad you're here, Patrick, too.

Tim Winders:

I love, I've told people this all the time.

Tim Winders:

One of the things I love about doing this is I get an hour

Tim Winders:

to just push everything away.

Tim Winders:

And so the person listening in, this is what they get.

Tim Winders:

And let's just have a deep, probably fun conversation about stuff, cool stuff.

Tim Winders:

And we're going to do that today.

Tim Winders:

Before I do that, though, let me ask, we, we just bumped into each other.

Tim Winders:

We're on a plane or something like that.

Tim Winders:

And I ask you what you do, what do you say when someone

Tim Winders:

says, what do you do, Patrick?

Patrick Thean:

Tim, I actually help CEOs to not fail, but to rather succeed.

Patrick Thean:

And I choose those words because I help CEOs to execute their strategy.

Patrick Thean:

The CEO's job is really hard.

Patrick Thean:

It's really hard.

Patrick Thean:

The failure rate is really high.

Patrick Thean:

And most CEOs actually leave their jobs involuntarily.

Patrick Thean:

That's a nice way to say they got fired.

Patrick Thean:

So most CEOs leave their jobs involuntarily.

Patrick Thean:

how do you succeed?

Patrick Thean:

It's a hard job.

Patrick Thean:

So what I've learned along the way is that most CEOs don't fail for lack of

Patrick Thean:

strategy, but rather for the inability.

Patrick Thean:

To execute the strategy, which for me means achieving the commitments.

Patrick Thean:

They made a commitments to their customers, to their employees,

Patrick Thean:

to their shareholders, to their investors, to all their stakeholders.

Patrick Thean:

And, that is critical if you want to succeed.

Patrick Thean:

So at the day, it comes back down to, can you execute your strategy?

Patrick Thean:

Cause most CEOs I talked to have a strategy.

Tim Winders:

we're going to come back to the execution, but I want to ask some

Tim Winders:

questions about the, we, cause we have a lot of leaders, a lot of people with

Tim Winders:

different type organizations that listen in here and when we say CEO, I think

Tim Winders:

I, I conjure up visions of big, large corporations, but can you do a little bit

Tim Winders:

better defining what do you, when you say CEO, talk a little bit more about that.

Patrick Thean:

Yeah.

Patrick Thean:

so we typically work with clients, which are in the mid market or smaller.

Patrick Thean:

So basically when I say CEO, I mean anyone who runs a company and

Patrick Thean:

really the stuff that we do extends to the leader and their teams.

Patrick Thean:

So it's not just, it's not just a CEO.

Patrick Thean:

I was on a coaching call with a client recently.

Patrick Thean:

And I had to share with him, I said, success is not just based on you.

Patrick Thean:

success starts with you, yes, but success then percolates to your teams

Patrick Thean:

and can your leaders all execute.

Patrick Thean:

So we have a framework of success that helps you get focused,

Patrick Thean:

get aligned with each other and accountable to your commitments.

Patrick Thean:

And so that process extends.

Patrick Thean:

To the teams, not just the leader of the company, but to the teams and then to

Patrick Thean:

answer your question a bit more directly, we typically work with companies that

Patrick Thean:

have, at least 100 people or more.

Patrick Thean:

And we help them with three ways you know we have a methodology

Patrick Thean:

that gives them a framework to have all the right discussions to

Patrick Thean:

get focus aligned and accountable.

Patrick Thean:

We help them with software.

Patrick Thean:

That documents the bowls so that accountability can become real.

Patrick Thean:

Then we provide coaching and consulting to help them create

Patrick Thean:

the correct plans and to help them improve their performance habits.

Patrick Thean:

success really comes from, unfortunately, I say, unfortunately, because it's

Patrick Thean:

hard getting the right habits.

Patrick Thean:

And learning them and then practicing them, right?

Patrick Thean:

It's if I'm trying to lose weight and you said to me, Patrick,

Patrick Thean:

you to go run three miles a day.

Patrick Thean:

That's great.

Patrick Thean:

So today I go run three miles.

Patrick Thean:

I come back to, I say, Tim, I did my three miles.

Patrick Thean:

And you say, that's great, Patrick.

Patrick Thean:

but you got to do that tomorrow and the day after and the day after and

Patrick Thean:

the day after I had to keep doing it.

Patrick Thean:

Otherwise, I'm not going to lose weight.

Patrick Thean:

If I just ran three miles one day.

Patrick Thean:

And I said, Tim, I'm done.

Patrick Thean:

You'd be like, you're not done.

Patrick Thean:

You just did it one day.

Patrick Thean:

You got to keep doing it.

Patrick Thean:

doing well in the company, running a successful company is the same.

Patrick Thean:

it, if you are doing it really well, your rhythm should get boring.

Patrick Thean:

Like you should have a rhythm that is consistent that your employees,

Patrick Thean:

your team members can all depend on.

Patrick Thean:

and then.

Patrick Thean:

And then life becomes transparent and becomes, how should I say, the rhythm

Patrick Thean:

becomes part of you so that things just happen like you're breathing.

Patrick Thean:

Aren't you happy you don't have to tell your body to breathe?

Patrick Thean:

aren't you happy you don't have to go...

Patrick Thean:

Oh, I forgot to breathe.

Patrick Thean:

Oh yes.

Patrick Thean:

I feel better now.

Patrick Thean:

it's just natural.

Patrick Thean:

Therefore, a couple of performs well when it has a natural rhythm built

Patrick Thean:

in with people having natural habits.

Patrick Thean:

But every time I say the word natural, I realized that it's really not natural.

Patrick Thean:

It's really intentional and highly trained.

Tim Winders:

Yeah, that's a good word.

Tim Winders:

I love the word rhythms that I saw when, we were doing some research and all on you

Tim Winders:

that it seems like, the, the book rhythms, the rhythm systems, which I think is your

Tim Winders:

company and your structure seems like the word rhythm means quite a bit to you.

Tim Winders:

Is that correct?

Patrick Thean:

Very much Very much I've learned that nothing is done one time.

Patrick Thean:

if you want to succeed in anything, you got to get into a rhythm, you got to get

Patrick Thean:

into a cadence, you got to do it over and over again, and you're gonna get better.

Patrick Thean:

So it's like turning the flywheel, one click at a time, you get better and

Patrick Thean:

better until it's until it becomes, like I said, highly intentional

Patrick Thean:

and natural at the same time.

Patrick Thean:

So what I've discovered, Tim, is that when you've had.

Patrick Thean:

When a person, and this applies to both a person and a company, when you

Patrick Thean:

are inundated with a lot of stress, now stress comes in multiple ways.

Patrick Thean:

Stress comes with opportunities.

Patrick Thean:

Stress comes with problems.

Patrick Thean:

To your body, it's all the same.

Patrick Thean:

Opportunity comes, it's good stress, but it still hits your body.

Patrick Thean:

challenges come, crises come, it's all stress.

Patrick Thean:

So what I've learned is that, We all need a rhythm to process that, to, to process

Patrick Thean:

that, to execute that, to then reflect and learn from that, so we do better tomorrow.

Patrick Thean:

So if you come all the way down to what I call a micro

Patrick Thean:

rhythm, it's even for yourself.

Patrick Thean:

I, for example, I open up my day every day by taking a couple

Patrick Thean:

of minutes to be grateful.

Patrick Thean:

to God for, and I think of three people that I thank God for and pray for them.

Patrick Thean:

And then I go into what did I learn yesterday?

Patrick Thean:

Could be good, could be bad, but I learned something yesterday.

Patrick Thean:

And then I open up my calendar and I prioritize my day.

Patrick Thean:

What are my three things we can get done today?

Patrick Thean:

I call that my 10, 10, 10 process, because, if you have enough time, it

Patrick Thean:

should take 10, 10, 10, 30 minutes.

Patrick Thean:

10 minutes to be gratified, gratitude to Jesus, to God, and just relax.

Patrick Thean:

And then 10 minutes to reflect and learn from yesterday.

Patrick Thean:

And then 10 minutes to prioritize your day.

Patrick Thean:

Now, some of my clients can't get that done.

Patrick Thean:

I say, that's fine.

Patrick Thean:

Do 5, 5, 5.

Patrick Thean:

Can't get that done?

Patrick Thean:

Do 2, 2, 2.

Patrick Thean:

Can't get that done?

Patrick Thean:

Do 1, 1, 1.

Patrick Thean:

You got to tell me you can't, you got to at least find 5

Patrick Thean:

minutes to begin your day right.

Patrick Thean:

And if in the end of the day.

Patrick Thean:

If you do a 5 5, if you do a 1 1 1 or 2 2 2, that accounts to maybe 2% of all

Patrick Thean:

the time that God gave you in a day.

Patrick Thean:

can we not even take one to two percent just to refresh

Patrick Thean:

ourselves and get a day right?

Patrick Thean:

So that's what I call a micro rhythm.

Patrick Thean:

if you can do that on a daily basis, that would really help people,

Patrick Thean:

achieve more results for themselves.

Patrick Thean:

So that's a rhythm.

Patrick Thean:

That's a micro rhythm.

Tim Winders:

So Patrick, what is the difference?

Tim Winders:

I love this conversation.

Tim Winders:

I think this is extremely valuable to anyone in a, we'll call it a leadership

Tim Winders:

role because I think the clients you work with, yes, it's valuable there, let's

Tim Winders:

just talk about someone who's head of a family or head of a small organization,

Tim Winders:

ministry, anything like that.

Tim Winders:

But tell me.

Tim Winders:

What the difference is, if there is between a rhythm and a habit,

Tim Winders:

if there is, or at least what's the contrast or how do they, how are they

Tim Winders:

similar and how are they different?

Patrick Thean:

Yeah.

Patrick Thean:

so when I say get into a rhythm, I would say that, you literally get into

Patrick Thean:

rhythm, get into a rhythm of reflection, of thinking, of planning and doing, in

Patrick Thean:

a company rhythm, we specify you do a weekly rhythm for your company, you do a

Patrick Thean:

monthly rhythm, and then you do a planning rhythm that is quarterly and annually.

Patrick Thean:

Okay.

Patrick Thean:

Your rhythm does become a habit.

Patrick Thean:

It does.

Patrick Thean:

However, in when you're practicing this rhythm, there are a number of other habits

Patrick Thean:

that you need to do in order to do well.

Patrick Thean:

So I would say that a rhythm puts you into a cadence where you can practice

Patrick Thean:

some of these good habits, like the one I just described about opening your day.

Patrick Thean:

That's a habit to open your day.

Patrick Thean:

And getting to a daily rhythm to do that, say every morning at 6am while I'm having

Patrick Thean:

coffee or before I have coffee, I spend time with the Lord, I do this rhythm.

Patrick Thean:

So that's putting me into a rhythm.

Patrick Thean:

And if I can calendar that, That's a rhythm now.

Patrick Thean:

So if I have a fixed rhythm to do that, it makes it much easier

Patrick Thean:

for me to exercise the habit of opening and reflecting on my day.

Patrick Thean:

So for example, I do this very, I do this pretty well, but when I go on vacation.

Patrick Thean:

I have trouble doing it.

Patrick Thean:

Why?

Patrick Thean:

Because my rhythm got messed up.

Patrick Thean:

See?

Patrick Thean:

when my rhythm gets messed up, I'm flying over here, I'm taking a tour,

Patrick Thean:

so I gotta go, okay, my habit of reflecting and opening my day, today

Patrick Thean:

I gotta do it at 6am, tomorrow I gotta do it at 7am, the day after that

Patrick Thean:

I gotta do it at 5am because of my travel when I'm on a holiday, right?

Patrick Thean:

On a vacation.

Patrick Thean:

So that's when the rhythm is out of sync.

Patrick Thean:

And I promise you, if your rhythm gets broken and you go on this vacation,

Patrick Thean:

you come back and you realize you say, wow, the 10 day vacation I

Patrick Thean:

took, I only reflected and opened up my day four to five times out of 10

Patrick Thean:

days because my rhythm was broken.

Patrick Thean:

And when my rhythm is broken, it's not unconscious anymore

Patrick Thean:

or subconscious anymore.

Patrick Thean:

I got to really find specific time to do something.

Patrick Thean:

I have a, one of my guys that works with me, Ryan, he's a pastor.

Patrick Thean:

I joke with him.

Patrick Thean:

I say, you work for me by day and you work for God by night.

Patrick Thean:

but he's a pastor and he runs a church or he ministers in a church

Patrick Thean:

that believes in tent making.

Patrick Thean:

so all the three passes there have jobs in the real world.

Patrick Thean:

and with Ryan, I pray with him once a week on Mondays, and if something happens

Patrick Thean:

and we missed that day, for example, we'll be trying to schedule a time to

Patrick Thean:

pray, but oftentimes we can't seem to get it in before the weekends, right?

Patrick Thean:

So that's the difference, or the complementary of a rhythm.

Patrick Thean:

So we have a rhythm to pray every Monday at two o'clock.

Patrick Thean:

And if we, and it's a habit.

Patrick Thean:

So if whatever reason he's on vacation or I'm on a different time zone and

Patrick Thean:

we can't do that, we will try our very best to reschedule during that week.

Patrick Thean:

Sometimes we achieve it.

Patrick Thean:

Sometimes we don't, but the rhythm helps make sure that your habits.

Patrick Thean:

Being practiced?

Tim Winders:

And I think people will find that if like you and Ryan missed two

Tim Winders:

weeks, three weeks, then sometimes it.

Tim Winders:

disappears, what does it do for you?

Tim Winders:

I'm just curious.

Tim Winders:

This is a curiosity question because my wife tells me when I don't do my rhythm

Tim Winders:

or my habits, my morning routine, that at times I could be a little bit grouchy

Tim Winders:

or a little off or something like that.

Tim Winders:

and I don't like that.

Tim Winders:

I would like to at times be more.

Tim Winders:

Flexible.

Tim Winders:

I'm very much a creature of habit.

Tim Winders:

Now I know some people listening, they're hearing this going, Oh my

Tim Winders:

gosh, that seems so restrictive.

Tim Winders:

And the others are going, amen.

Tim Winders:

That's exactly what I do.

Tim Winders:

I'm like, I'm rigid and all that.

Tim Winders:

so how do we sometimes structure?

Tim Winders:

And I know people have families and stuff like that.

Tim Winders:

So talk a little bit about a little bit of, I don't even like the word balance.

Tim Winders:

That's not the right word, but wholeness or.

Patrick Thean:

I would say the following, I would say, the following I would say

Patrick Thean:

is, I wouldn't use the word restrictive.

Patrick Thean:

I would say that all of us human beings are creatures of habit.

Patrick Thean:

Even the ones who like to brag about our flexibility and our, individual craziness.

Patrick Thean:

And, but I promise you, most of us human beings, we're a creature of habit.

Patrick Thean:

We may not wanna admit it, but we're a creature of habit.

Patrick Thean:

So I would say that there's a difference between a habit.

Patrick Thean:

a rhythm or being restrictive.

Patrick Thean:

So my point is that, if, for example, you miss your, so the rhythm helps you

Patrick Thean:

to do things, I would say, unconsciously.

Patrick Thean:

So that's why when you miss your, your early morning start or whatever, you're

Patrick Thean:

thrown off for the rest of the day.

Patrick Thean:

And I think that Even knowing that should help you to be intentional, right?

Patrick Thean:

In other words, and I'm the same way.

Patrick Thean:

if I didn't wake up early enough, or I woke too late last night, so I didn't

Patrick Thean:

wake up early enough today, I can tell you that yes, I'm going to be more earthable,

Patrick Thean:

I'm going to be more grouchy, etc.

Patrick Thean:

However, That's not the job.

Patrick Thean:

The job of a CEO like me is to show up every day, not for me, but for my team.

Patrick Thean:

So then unfortunately that day, I just have to be more intentional.

Patrick Thean:

I have to be more self aware that Patrick, you had a bad night last night.

Patrick Thean:

I just have to be self aware and say, okay, I didn't get to open

Patrick Thean:

my day today the way I want to, but I'm now self aware and highly

Patrick Thean:

intentional about how I carry myself the rest of the day and I can do it.

Patrick Thean:

And so can you.

Patrick Thean:

It would take more energy.

Patrick Thean:

It would just take more energy that day.

Patrick Thean:

And you just have to understand that I'm going to be self aware,

Patrick Thean:

be intentional, take more energy, and then I can recover tonight.

Patrick Thean:

Tonight, make sure I have a good night's sleep, open up my day

Patrick Thean:

correctly the next day, right?

Patrick Thean:

So I think the rhythm helps you.

Patrick Thean:

Whatever rhythm you have helps you get into what I call a framework and a rhythm

Patrick Thean:

of success and success built upon success.

Tim Winders:

I love this conversation on rhythms, but the thing that keeps popping

Tim Winders:

in my head are work that I've done with executives and leaders, conversations

Tim Winders:

I've heard about people that struggle.

Tim Winders:

To get into rhythm.

Tim Winders:

I want to go back to the example you used earlier, just about the,

Tim Winders:

what we'll call the morning routine.

Tim Winders:

you said that at times you have clients, CEOs that say, I don't have 30 minutes.

Tim Winders:

I don't have 20 minutes.

Tim Winders:

I don't have 10.

Tim Winders:

I don't have five.

Tim Winders:

And what I heard when you were saying that was there's a good chance they

Tim Winders:

either have negative habits or habits.

Tim Winders:

Maybe mindsets that are preventing them or, it's another thing, maybe

Tim Winders:

they just don't want it bad enough.

Tim Winders:

I don't know.

Tim Winders:

What are some of the barriers and I think you and I are rhythm guys.

Tim Winders:

We love being in a rhythm that leads to things, but what have you

Tim Winders:

had to help people work through?

Tim Winders:

I have to do it some a lot of people are listening in going, okay, I want that.

Tim Winders:

But how do I break through the barrier of getting to it?

Tim Winders:

If I'm just struggling with, I get up in the morning and I scroll through my phone.

Tim Winders:

That's a bad, I think that's a bad habit, but some people

Tim Winders:

might be part of their job.

Tim Winders:

so help the people that can't quite get into a rhythm for whatever reason.

Tim Winders:

Some of them are in leadership roles too, by the way, they've worked their way up.

Tim Winders:

so help us out a little bit there.

Patrick Thean:

So there are two things I would share with you.

Patrick Thean:

One is the concept of.

Patrick Thean:

Owners owning versus being a victim.

Patrick Thean:

So God gave you and me the same amount of time, 24 hours a day.

Patrick Thean:

so why is it that some people can do it and some people can't, I would

Patrick Thean:

say that you go to the first own it.

Patrick Thean:

And accept that it's your fault that you haven't done so a lot of

Patrick Thean:

the folks I work with, the first part is for them to accept that when

Patrick Thean:

they say, I don't have enough time.

Patrick Thean:

That makes it sound like they're a slave to whatever it is that's

Patrick Thean:

happening their life versus owning it and saying, wait a minute.

Patrick Thean:

I own my 24 hours.

Patrick Thean:

I can't make enough time.

Patrick Thean:

By the way, I'm a big Stephen Covey fan.

Patrick Thean:

And, Stephen Covey fan.

Patrick Thean:

And he talks about, Stephen Covey talks about, his seven habits, right?

Patrick Thean:

Of highly effective people.

Patrick Thean:

One of them is put first things first.

Patrick Thean:

In fact, his first three habits are about helping you own yourself.

Patrick Thean:

And be strong yourself.

Patrick Thean:

Then his next three habits are about getting a team working strong.

Patrick Thean:

Then the seventh habit is about sharpening the saw, which is about renewal.

Patrick Thean:

put first things first, is about prioritization.

Patrick Thean:

And I would say that number one, the person has to understand

Patrick Thean:

that he or she owns their time.

Patrick Thean:

Their time belongs to them, doesn't belong to anybody else.

Patrick Thean:

So when people say that demands for my time agreed, but you are

Patrick Thean:

the supplier, you decide whether or not I'm going to give you time.

Patrick Thean:

Thank you for inviting me for this podcast, but I decided

Patrick Thean:

to accept your invitation.

Patrick Thean:

I could have said.

Patrick Thean:

I don't want to accept the invitation.

Patrick Thean:

So you don't want me, by the way, I'm grateful.

Patrick Thean:

I'm just doing this as an example.

Patrick Thean:

So I could say, gee, I showed up for your podcast.

Patrick Thean:

I didn't really want to come.

Patrick Thean:

but I'm now a victim of your podcast.

Patrick Thean:

Or I could say, no.

Patrick Thean:

You invited me.

Patrick Thean:

I chose to come.

Patrick Thean:

I'm now here.

Patrick Thean:

I'm happy.

Patrick Thean:

Same thing.

Patrick Thean:

So when people say they don't have time, first, I want to teach

Patrick Thean:

them that they own their time.

Patrick Thean:

Nobody else owns their time.

Patrick Thean:

They own their time.

Patrick Thean:

and that's so part of that, the second lesson, which is related

Patrick Thean:

is the word prioritization.

Patrick Thean:

So a lot of people think that they're prioritizing by saying

Patrick Thean:

yes to a hundred things.

Patrick Thean:

And really, prioritization means you say yes to a couple or three or four, and then

Patrick Thean:

you actually say no to a bunch of things.

Patrick Thean:

You say no more than you say yes.

Patrick Thean:

So those are the two things that I would share with, leaders that I coach

Patrick Thean:

up front if they have trouble with, finding time to reflect on themselves.

Patrick Thean:

And then I would say, Tim, the third thing is sometimes, People have a

Patrick Thean:

misconception, or something buried in their psyche, is that when they do

Patrick Thean:

things for themselves, it's selfish.

Patrick Thean:

A lot of folks, especially folks who are taught to be giving and

Patrick Thean:

generous, sometimes they create an image in their own minds that to

Patrick Thean:

take care of themselves is selfish.

Patrick Thean:

when you're in the plane, and bad things happen, and the oxygen mask

Patrick Thean:

falls down, what do they always say?

Patrick Thean:

They say, first, put the oxygen mask on yourself before putting

Patrick Thean:

it on your kid or somebody else.

Patrick Thean:

Because if you can't even breathe.

Patrick Thean:

You can't help somebody over there who can't breathe.

Patrick Thean:

So step one is put the oxygen mask on yourself, then you help your child.

Patrick Thean:

Same thing here is I want people to really understand that first they

Patrick Thean:

got to take care of themselves.

Patrick Thean:

They shouldn't feel guilty that they need time to improve

Patrick Thean:

themselves, and help themselves grow.

Patrick Thean:

So I found that a lot of leaders who are servant leaders sometimes get the

Patrick Thean:

wrong impression to be a servant leader you're supposed to serve the others and

Patrick Thean:

therefore you don't take care of yourself.

Patrick Thean:

You eat last right leaders eat last.

Patrick Thean:

Yes, in many ways, leaders should eat last, but in many ways, if you

Patrick Thean:

don't fill yourself with what you need to, you would be too empty to

Patrick Thean:

serve others so there's that balance.

Tim Winders:

they eat last, but they still eat.

Tim Winders:

It's not like they starve.

Tim Winders:

It's not like they're on a hunger strike because everyone else is eating.

Tim Winders:

I like that.

Tim Winders:

I like that analogy.

Tim Winders:

I had a flashback to the gosh, it had to be the early nineties when I was teaching

Tim Winders:

time management in the corporate setting.

Tim Winders:

And I remember saying this often.

Tim Winders:

And I haven't said this in a while, but you brought it, you gave me a flashback.

Tim Winders:

It's if you don't own your time, someone else will, and that sounds a

Tim Winders:

little harsh now, but it goes to, I've got one more kind of general question

Tim Winders:

for, I want to do some background on you and then we're going to talk about

Tim Winders:

your book and some of your processes and structures, but you brought up the

Tim Winders:

word victim and the reason that is.

Tim Winders:

Kind of welling around inside of me right now is just having a conversation

Tim Winders:

the other day with the leader of an organization and we're on the same page

Tim Winders:

with our thought process and we were talking about some of their teams And

Tim Winders:

some of the people with the company and unfortunately, we might have been

Tim Winders:

commiserating about a certain generation.

Tim Winders:

I hate doing that.

Tim Winders:

You can't lump people together we're 50 plus and we were talking about

Tim Winders:

a generation maybe in the 25 to 35 range And we were talking about that

Tim Winders:

victim mindset and how challenging it can be And we were just wondering if

Tim Winders:

we're seeing more of that if there's a lot more out there You know, how are

Tim Winders:

we going to work with it as leaders?

Tim Winders:

How are we going to run teams and things like that?

Tim Winders:

And I know we've got some practical things we may talk about in just a moment, but

Tim Winders:

talk about in general, or are we seeing more of that mindset in today's world?

Tim Winders:

Are you seeing it creep in even to people that have reached the executive suite

Tim Winders:

level, because years past right or wrong, people would not have reached those

Tim Winders:

levels of leadership with that mindset.

Tim Winders:

So what are you seeing just related to what we'll just throw a lump

Tim Winders:

into victim mindset, because I think we're going to have to deal with it.

Patrick Thean:

Yeah.

Patrick Thean:

So I don't know that I'm seeing that.

Patrick Thean:

I think that I'm seeing more of the world is more socially aware.

Patrick Thean:

And I think that the people are putting more power, giving up more power to

Patrick Thean:

what the social media tells them.

Patrick Thean:

So what that means to me is that you gotta be careful not to let the social

Patrick Thean:

medias and social stuff rule your life, but you can, it's easy to, it's easy to

Patrick Thean:

fall into that, so I don't know that's a victim mindset as much of a, I feel judged

Patrick Thean:

by social media, and so I need to, solve that problem, and I think it's a fine line

Patrick Thean:

between saying, look, maybe I shouldn't care as much, I shouldn't care as much

Patrick Thean:

about what people have to say about me.

Patrick Thean:

I should be more real.

Patrick Thean:

So I think the challenge is what I'm seeing is that it may be harder to get

Patrick Thean:

to the real person for the person to feel vulnerable enough to share what

Patrick Thean:

is really happening with them because they're afraid that, something gets

Patrick Thean:

out there that they would and could be judged and it'd be difficult to solve.

Patrick Thean:

So I see that more as a victim mindset, more as a, Hey, social

Patrick Thean:

media is more powerful now.

Patrick Thean:

I got to be careful.

Patrick Thean:

I don't want to be so transparent.

Patrick Thean:

I want to be less vulnerable.

Patrick Thean:

I want to be more politically correct.

Patrick Thean:

Things like that.

Patrick Thean:

That's what I, that's what I see.

Patrick Thean:

So I think that in a company.

Patrick Thean:

You have a lot that you can control.

Patrick Thean:

You can control your culture, your core values in such a way that rewards

Patrick Thean:

transparency, vulnerability, and reduces judgmentalism as much as possible.

Patrick Thean:

so for example, in my firm, we, we have a core value called

Patrick Thean:

no thinly disguised contempt.

Patrick Thean:

What that really means is that if you've wronged me in any way, shape, or form,

Patrick Thean:

I need to clean my slate with you.

Patrick Thean:

I need to come to you and say, Hey, Tim, when you said that the

Patrick Thean:

other day, it hurt my feelings.

Patrick Thean:

I don't know if you knew what you meant, but this is what I felt and clear the air.

Patrick Thean:

what this came from my first.

Patrick Thean:

But he actually, when I found that I had a lot of really intelligent

Patrick Thean:

programmers, software company, and the trouble of really intelligent people

Patrick Thean:

is really intelligent people also get really offended really quickly

Patrick Thean:

or really disappointed very quickly.

Patrick Thean:

They have very high standards.

Patrick Thean:

And if you miss their standard, they get disappointed.

Patrick Thean:

And then if you layer in an inability to resolve conflict, now I avoid you.

Patrick Thean:

So when I avoid you is like this guy's content, you disappointed me.

Patrick Thean:

Instead of resolving it, I now avoid you.

Patrick Thean:

and so the way it shows up is that, Hey, Tim, I want you

Patrick Thean:

to work with Jack over here.

Patrick Thean:

and you would say, Patrick, Jack's a good guy, but why don't you put

Patrick Thean:

him on the other person's team?

Patrick Thean:

I don't really want him on my team.

Patrick Thean:

Why is that?

Patrick Thean:

no, he's a good guy.

Patrick Thean:

He's a good guy, but I just don't really enjoy working with him.

Patrick Thean:

Why is that?

Patrick Thean:

I don't really know.

Patrick Thean:

you do know, you just don't want to tell me.

Patrick Thean:

So in my firm, we have this core value called no thinly disguised

Patrick Thean:

contempt where we need to resolve.

Patrick Thean:

That's hard to do.

Patrick Thean:

That's hard to do.

Patrick Thean:

And then the second thing I would say is that I've also tried my

Patrick Thean:

very best to instill a mindset that it's okay to make mistakes.

Patrick Thean:

In fact, when you make mistakes and you tell me bad news, the first

Patrick Thean:

thing I would say is thank you.

Patrick Thean:

Thank you for letting me know that, Tim, that went wrong.

Patrick Thean:

Now we can go fix it together.

Patrick Thean:

So those are a couple of mindsets and values that we've put in place

Patrick Thean:

to try and create an atmosphere where people don't feel judged if they made

Patrick Thean:

a mistake, and have also have the ability and the tools to come back to

Patrick Thean:

people and say, Hey, did I wrong you just now or did I upset you or hey,

Patrick Thean:

you upset me just now and resolve that.

Patrick Thean:

And I believe that can improve vulnerability and performance.

Patrick Thean:

So I believe that, or what I've seen actually is that, a team cannot really

Patrick Thean:

reach peak performance if they're not willing to be transparent to each other.

Patrick Thean:

Unfortunately, transparency needs vulnerability.

Patrick Thean:

So if you're not willing to be vulnerable.

Patrick Thean:

You won't be transparent because I'm afraid now, right?

Patrick Thean:

if I'm afraid of you hitting me, I'm not going to be transparent.

Patrick Thean:

So you almost need vulnerability.

Patrick Thean:

Then you lay on transparency.

Patrick Thean:

Now we can talk about what we want to achieve as a team.

Patrick Thean:

Get focused, aligned, accountable to achieve the results.

Tim Winders:

I think many individuals, leaders, and also I think people on teams,

Tim Winders:

I think they struggle with vulnerability and transparency as it especially relates

Tim Winders:

to being strong, powerful, and decisive.

Tim Winders:

It's like those.

Tim Winders:

Those three or four or five traits, whatever, they don't

Tim Winders:

seem to live in the same body.

Tim Winders:

I know for me, my personality is wired.

Tim Winders:

I'm a, I grew up in the seventies, came into business, started

Tim Winders:

first company in the eighties.

Tim Winders:

And I was just like, Strong, pretty bold and vulnerable and transparent

Tim Winders:

would not have been words that would have been used to describe me.

Tim Winders:

I don't, you think people maybe are still struggling a little bit with

Tim Winders:

that, with the, the culture we're in.

Patrick Thean:

Especially folks that are my age, your age, who come from

Patrick Thean:

the baby boomer section of the world.

Patrick Thean:

I would say that.

Patrick Thean:

My message to all the leaders who have this kind of experience is God

Patrick Thean:

has given you fantastic experience.

Patrick Thean:

Now the question is, how do you not use your experience?

Patrick Thean:

As a repetitive thing.

Patrick Thean:

How do you use it as a sieve to, to use your experience, but based on the

Patrick Thean:

cultural, changes that happened today.

Patrick Thean:

yes, the world is gentle.

Patrick Thean:

I would say that, running a company in the 80s and 90s.

Patrick Thean:

you could, you, you could be a lot more direct, but by the way, a lot

Patrick Thean:

of people think that, you can be direct without being a jerk, too.

Patrick Thean:

You can be tough and kind at the same time, and I think that the challenge

Patrick Thean:

that we're now presented with is to be able to be non dualistic in our thinking.

Patrick Thean:

there are a lot of myths, I call these myths, where people think, oh, to

Patrick Thean:

be, to be a good, boss with results.

Patrick Thean:

You got to be a jerk.

Patrick Thean:

You got to be tough.

Patrick Thean:

You can't be kind.

Patrick Thean:

And I got to tell you, all Singapore boys, I'm from Singapore and all

Patrick Thean:

Singapore boys serve in the military.

Patrick Thean:

Therefore.

Patrick Thean:

Now it's two years, but when I was growing up, it was two and a half years.

Patrick Thean:

And so I went through the Singapore military and I, I went to officer

Patrick Thean:

school and I came out as an officer.

Patrick Thean:

And I remember one day, one of my men did something wrong and

Patrick Thean:

I brought him to my office.

Patrick Thean:

And usually the officers in the military, they're yelling at you.

Patrick Thean:

They're yelling profanities and they're going.

Patrick Thean:

this and that and tough guy thing and so I, I said, I talked to my guy and I said,

Patrick Thean:

Hey, these are the things you did wrong.

Patrick Thean:

Do you understand that?

Patrick Thean:

He said, yes, sir, I do.

Patrick Thean:

Okay.

Patrick Thean:

help me understand how you understand it.

Patrick Thean:

Like we walked through it all and we were done.

Patrick Thean:

I said, all right, on your way out there, see the stuff Sergeant

Patrick Thean:

and take two extra weekend duties.

Patrick Thean:

He was stunned.

Patrick Thean:

He said, sir, I'm sorry, sir.

Patrick Thean:

I said.

Patrick Thean:

You heard me.

Patrick Thean:

On the way out, see Staff Sergeant and take two extra duties.

Patrick Thean:

And he looked at me and goes, wow, oh, he couldn't process.

Patrick Thean:

He was like, what he was thinking was, but you didn't yell at me.

Patrick Thean:

You didn't shout profanities at me.

Patrick Thean:

You didn't do any of that, er stuff, right?

Patrick Thean:

And he was a little bit confused.

Patrick Thean:

And I said, Corporal, there are consequences.

Patrick Thean:

To your actions.

Patrick Thean:

You understand that, right?

Patrick Thean:

He said, yes, sir.

Patrick Thean:

I said, so just because they didn't get mad at you, didn't yell

Patrick Thean:

at you, doesn't mean you don't have to face the consequences.

Patrick Thean:

You understand that, right?

Patrick Thean:

He thought about it for a minute.

Patrick Thean:

He said, I do now, sir.

Patrick Thean:

I said, good.

Patrick Thean:

So go out there, see Staff Sergeant, take extra duties.

Patrick Thean:

He said, I got it.

Patrick Thean:

And he went out.

Patrick Thean:

So my point is dualistic thinking.

Patrick Thean:

I'm going to yell at you, shout at you, punch you in the

Patrick Thean:

face, take two extra duties.

Patrick Thean:

No.

Patrick Thean:

Instead, I was kind to him, I explained it to him, I wanted to make sure

Patrick Thean:

he wouldn't do it again, and go out there and take two extra duties.

Patrick Thean:

I think that we have a lot of, we have a lot of models in our head

Patrick Thean:

that cause us to be dualistic in our thinking, You can't be tough.

Patrick Thean:

for example, most people would say, Hey, why don't you hold that person

Patrick Thean:

accountable to achieving the results?

Patrick Thean:

And they would say, Well, I don't want to be a jerk.

Patrick Thean:

I didn't ask you to be a jerk.

Patrick Thean:

I asked you to hold him accountable to achieving results.

Patrick Thean:

Why is that being a jerk?

Patrick Thean:

Because that person has in his mind two models.

Patrick Thean:

I can either be tough or kind.

Patrick Thean:

And I'm saying, no, you got to be tough and kind.

Patrick Thean:

And then I explain why.

Patrick Thean:

So let's say you work for me and you're not doing very well.

Patrick Thean:

And I don't correct you.

Patrick Thean:

I don't teach you.

Patrick Thean:

And therefore a year from now, I can't promote you.

Patrick Thean:

And therefore three years from now, I have to fire you for non performance.

Patrick Thean:

Am I being kind?

Patrick Thean:

No, actually three years ago, I should have said, Tim, these are the three

Patrick Thean:

things you did that are going to stop you from progressing in your career.

Patrick Thean:

Would you like to learn about them?

Patrick Thean:

You probably would say, yes, what am I doing that's stopping me

Patrick Thean:

from progressing in my career?

Patrick Thean:

And I will tell you, you don't come to work on time.

Patrick Thean:

You deliver work to me late.

Patrick Thean:

And by the way, you made too many mistakes in your programs.

Patrick Thean:

Can you fix those three things, please?

Patrick Thean:

Wow.

Patrick Thean:

Okay.

Patrick Thean:

I, what did I just do?

Patrick Thean:

I just coached you and taught you and helped you become better.

Patrick Thean:

I'm not being a jerk.

Patrick Thean:

I'm not being, but I'm being tough.

Patrick Thean:

I'm letting you know, if you don't fix these three things, you probably

Patrick Thean:

can't look towards a promotion.

Patrick Thean:

So if you don't fix these three things, next year, when it comes

Patrick Thean:

time to promotion or discussions and you, and I say, Hey, Tim, you're

Patrick Thean:

not getting promoted this year.

Patrick Thean:

You go, Patrick, why?

Patrick Thean:

I said, I pointed out three things to you, didn't I?

Patrick Thean:

You show up to work on time and you write code a certain way.

Patrick Thean:

You need a certain thing.

Patrick Thean:

You didn't do it.

Patrick Thean:

So I'm sorry.

Patrick Thean:

You're not getting promoted.

Patrick Thean:

but then a year later when you, when we talk about promotions

Patrick Thean:

and salary increases, I come up with a nonsensical reason, right?

Patrick Thean:

I say things like, you don't have enough experience compared to Jack

Patrick Thean:

over there who's getting promoted.

Patrick Thean:

But in my brain, I'm thinking, you don't do good work.

Patrick Thean:

so I need to tell you, look, you're not doing great work.

Patrick Thean:

All right.

Patrick Thean:

You're making too many mistakes.

Patrick Thean:

You're not showing up on time.

Patrick Thean:

So I'm not being a jerk.

Patrick Thean:

I'm actually being kind because I'm helping you get better.

Patrick Thean:

for audience listening in, think about the best managers you've

Patrick Thean:

ever worked for, which ones of them that you respect the most.

Patrick Thean:

I promise you, it's going to come back to the managers that

Patrick Thean:

did what I just described.

Patrick Thean:

They were able to tell you some tough things, hold you to a higher standard,

Patrick Thean:

and maybe even the best ones would expect you to achieve something that maybe you

Patrick Thean:

didn't even think you could achieve, but they held you to a higher standard,

Patrick Thean:

and they coached you, and you got there.

Patrick Thean:

Those were probably tough managers.

Patrick Thean:

They were not nice managers who didn't tell you what you had to improve.

Tim Winders:

the thing to me and I think we'll talk about this in just

Tim Winders:

a moment because I think it's part of your system is that it seems as

Tim Winders:

if we have a lack of or maybe we just don't have as many people that are

Tim Winders:

willing to have mature, focused, timely conversations in the world we're in today.

Tim Winders:

I want to hold that thought.

Tim Winders:

For one second.

Tim Winders:

And I want to get to that in just a moment, but I want to back up a second

Tim Winders:

because one of the things we do here is we talk about redefining success and

Tim Winders:

how people come to be where they are.

Tim Winders:

And you brought up a couple of things that I can't leave.

Tim Winders:

You brought up that you were in the military in Singapore, you grew up there.

Tim Winders:

And then also know that you had a company that led to an exit a few years back.

Tim Winders:

So what I would love for us to do here in a few minutes is just

Tim Winders:

let's give a little bit of Patrick.

Tim Winders:

I joke at times the early years or whatever, tell us whatever you think

Tim Winders:

might be pertinent to the conversation of redefining success and how you

Tim Winders:

came to be who you are and come up with the thought processes and the

Tim Winders:

systems and the rhythms you have now.

Tim Winders:

Just fill in the gaps a little bit, either the way you grew up a

Tim Winders:

military and then how'd you, how you got in the business world,

Patrick Thean:

I would share with you that I'm an engineer.

Patrick Thean:

So I'm an electrical engineer.

Patrick Thean:

and I think that I've been very blessed.

Patrick Thean:

I had a wonderful childhood where I was highly encouraged to express myself.

Patrick Thean:

Now that's unique coming from Singapore, a country that is very steeped in rules.

Patrick Thean:

But, I was always encouraged to express myself.

Patrick Thean:

And so I came to the U.

Patrick Thean:

S.

Patrick Thean:

to study.

Patrick Thean:

And I think that, so I'm a child of East and West, I grew up in

Patrick Thean:

Singapore, 17 years, came to U.

Patrick Thean:

S., went to Cornell University.

Patrick Thean:

And then I went to work for Oracle.

Patrick Thean:

Now, when I went to work for Oracle, after my military, I went to work for Oracle.

Patrick Thean:

Oracle today is a multi billion dollar, one of the best, biggest

Patrick Thean:

software companies in the world.

Patrick Thean:

Back then it was about a 500 million firm.

Patrick Thean:

And it was growing at 100% a year.

Patrick Thean:

So I think that, I would encourage, first of all, the young people.

Patrick Thean:

I would tell you that your first job is really important.

Patrick Thean:

And I think that I was very fortunate to be put into Oracle.

Patrick Thean:

And Oracle is a place that encouraged individualism thinking, encouraged you

Patrick Thean:

to put yourself out there to go forward.

Patrick Thean:

Now Oracle isn't All perfect either.

Patrick Thean:

Oracle, I think was a tough place to survive.

Patrick Thean:

if you wouldn't, it was definitely a dog eat dog world when I was there

Patrick Thean:

back in the eighties, late eighties.

Patrick Thean:

And if you didn't perform in a couple of quarters, you'd be cut.

Patrick Thean:

So Oracle was a tough place to work, but one, one of the few things I think these

Patrick Thean:

are the things that made me successful.

Patrick Thean:

Number one, I was fortunate enough to have a lot of love in my life.

Patrick Thean:

And so I have a healthy ego I have a healthy ego.

Patrick Thean:

but secondly, I also have enough humility to learn.

Patrick Thean:

And I remember this one guy at Oracle, my, my first year there, he was upset

Patrick Thean:

with our programming and he yelled at me and the senior consultant.

Patrick Thean:

And he yelled at us and he called us amateurs.

Patrick Thean:

The senior consultant came to me and she was furious.

Patrick Thean:

She said, how can Mike call us amateurs?

Patrick Thean:

That is so unprofessional, blah, blah, blah, blah.

Patrick Thean:

And I thought about it and I thought, yeah, that hurt my ego a little bit.

Patrick Thean:

But I said to her, I said, he's right.

Patrick Thean:

We're amateurs.

Patrick Thean:

Yeah, but he didn't have to say that.

Patrick Thean:

And I'm like, yeah, but okay.

Patrick Thean:

But he's right.

Patrick Thean:

Code we wrote was bad.

Patrick Thean:

We're in a customer that has, that expects delivery.

Patrick Thean:

And we didn't do a good job.

Patrick Thean:

So she got all mad with Mike and she walked off.

Patrick Thean:

I took the other route.

Patrick Thean:

I went up to Mike and I said, Hey, Mike, you called me an amateur just now.

Patrick Thean:

And Mike got to fight mode.

Patrick Thean:

He was like, yeah.

Patrick Thean:

So what about it?

Patrick Thean:

What about it?

Patrick Thean:

And I said, Mike, you are right.

Patrick Thean:

I'm a man.

Patrick Thean:

No, he said, what are you gonna do about it?

Patrick Thean:

So I said, Mike, you're right.

Patrick Thean:

I'm an amateur.

Patrick Thean:

It's not what I'm going to do about it.

Patrick Thean:

It's what are you willing to do about it?

Patrick Thean:

Because what do you mean?

Patrick Thean:

I said, I want to learn what you teach me.

Patrick Thean:

So instead of me, I could have chosen to be like the other person

Patrick Thean:

and gone all upset and offended.

Patrick Thean:

He called me an amateur.

Patrick Thean:

But I didn't.

Patrick Thean:

I recognized that this guy was one of the best programmers that we had in the team.

Patrick Thean:

The best, actually, on our team.

Patrick Thean:

And...

Patrick Thean:

I asked him, I said, will you teach me now?

Patrick Thean:

I just graduated university.

Patrick Thean:

So he made fun of me.

Patrick Thean:

He said, she's a well college boy, Ivy league boy.

Patrick Thean:

He said, it'll be homework.

Patrick Thean:

They'll be homework.

Patrick Thean:

I'll give you homework every night.

Patrick Thean:

And I laughed.

Patrick Thean:

I said, bring it on, Mike, if you're willing to teach me, give me homework.

Patrick Thean:

I will deliver homework every morning.

Patrick Thean:

He laughed.

Patrick Thean:

He goes, you college boys, I swear, but okay, fine.

Patrick Thean:

I'll teach you.

Patrick Thean:

And I'll give you homework every single day.

Patrick Thean:

You miss one homework assignment.

Patrick Thean:

I'll stop teaching you.

Patrick Thean:

And I just worked every night and anything he gave me, I worked on and I became a

Patrick Thean:

great programmer in six months, I learned what most people would have taken them

Patrick Thean:

four or five years to learn it all.

Patrick Thean:

I got this guy to teach me in an intense way every single day.

Patrick Thean:

that was incredible.

Patrick Thean:

So for me, I think one thing that is part of my makeup is

Patrick Thean:

that I'm very curious to learn.

Patrick Thean:

I am very, as much knowledge as I accumulate or as much experience as I

Patrick Thean:

get, I would like to approach things as though I know nothing, because I feel like

Patrick Thean:

if I walk into a room where I know 50%, I'm only open to learning the other 50%.

Patrick Thean:

But I walk the room, and I believe I know nothing.

Patrick Thean:

I'm going to learn 100% of whatever that person has to offer and serve me.

Patrick Thean:

So that's a lot of, I think, my psyche.

Patrick Thean:

And so when I sold my first company, We were very successful

Patrick Thean:

from the world looking in.

Patrick Thean:

We're very successful.

Patrick Thean:

We're Inc.

Patrick Thean:

500, number 151 on the Inc.

Patrick Thean:

500 list of privately held companies.

Patrick Thean:

We were Entrepreneur of the Year.

Patrick Thean:

We had lots of awards.

Patrick Thean:

But from the inside looking out, I was running from one crisis to another,

Patrick Thean:

solving one problem to another, and then we solved enough to survive,

Patrick Thean:

and every time we survived again, and then suddenly we were successful.

Patrick Thean:

I didn't feel as successful as everyone said I was.

Patrick Thean:

and I set about to understand why, and at the same time in Charlotte, North

Patrick Thean:

Carolina, not a lot of tech firms.

Patrick Thean:

with a successful exit like that, and well known exit, I had a lot of

Patrick Thean:

entrepreneurs come ask me for help.

Patrick Thean:

And as I dived into their stuff, I realized that I wasn't

Patrick Thean:

as dumb as I thought I was.

Patrick Thean:

these poor guys were making a lot of the same mistakes.

Patrick Thean:

And then in 1999, Fortune magazine had this article by

Patrick Thean:

Ram Charan called why CEOs fail.

Patrick Thean:

And he profiled a number of well known guys like John Sculley from Apple.

Patrick Thean:

And the bottom line of the article was that these CEOs fail not because of a

Patrick Thean:

lack of strategy, but a lack of execution.

Patrick Thean:

So I thought hard about that.

Patrick Thean:

And I agreed with that, even for a lot of the companies I help, which are younger,

Patrick Thean:

smaller, oftentimes they'll come to me and say, Patrick, I need a strategy.

Patrick Thean:

My strategy is not working.

Patrick Thean:

But when I dive deep into it, I realized that they actually have

Patrick Thean:

a good strategy, but they're executing it poorly, making mistakes.

Patrick Thean:

Causing rework too slow.

Patrick Thean:

They missed a moment in time, and then they blame it on the

Patrick Thean:

strategy, or they have a team that isn't working well together.

Patrick Thean:

It's a people problem, not a strategy problem.

Patrick Thean:

So most of the time, when I work with, the companies I work with today, my team

Patrick Thean:

does, we find and discover that Most of our clients don't have a strategy problem,

Patrick Thean:

even though they think they might.

Patrick Thean:

They either have a teamwork problem, an alignment problem, or a inability

Patrick Thean:

to focus and to get things done when they're promised it will get done.

Patrick Thean:

Tim, it's funny.

Patrick Thean:

people come up to me and they say, How do I hold Jack accountable?

Patrick Thean:

Fictitious name I always use.

Patrick Thean:

And usually when somebody comes to me mad and says, Patrick,

Patrick Thean:

how do I hold Jack accountable?

Patrick Thean:

What they really mean is, How do I give Jack the consequences of his failure?

Patrick Thean:

Not how do I hold Jack accountable?

Patrick Thean:

that was much earlier.

Patrick Thean:

Like for me, accountability is a good word.

Patrick Thean:

Accountability means to account.

Patrick Thean:

It's made up of two words, account and ability.

Patrick Thean:

So let's account for your ability early in the process.

Patrick Thean:

And account for whether or not you believe you can achieve the

Patrick Thean:

goal you're supposed to achieve.

Patrick Thean:

And you account for that early on.

Patrick Thean:

And if you can't do it, you ask for help.

Patrick Thean:

You make adjustments.

Patrick Thean:

You solve the problem.

Patrick Thean:

When you get to the end of the project, and you've failed, and people

Patrick Thean:

say, I gotta hold you accountable, that's actually not accountability.

Patrick Thean:

That's actually saying, how do I give Patrick the consequences

Patrick Thean:

he deserves because he failed?

Patrick Thean:

That's what they really mean.

Patrick Thean:

So accountability to me is over here in the front part and all along the way.

Patrick Thean:

How do I help you to be accountable to achieve what you've committed to achieve

Patrick Thean:

so we get there and you've achieved it?

Patrick Thean:

So I don't know if I answered your question.

Patrick Thean:

I rambled a little bit.

Patrick Thean:

I apologize.

Patrick Thean:

but you asked me about my, my, my mindset, my thinking.

Patrick Thean:

So my philosophy is really about.

Patrick Thean:

You've got to be curious, you've got to learn, you've got to be humble, you've got

Patrick Thean:

to, you've got to take every opportunity to experience, and then you've got to

Patrick Thean:

find ways to be very focused, execution is about being focused, it's about making

Patrick Thean:

sure the people around you are all working on the same things together, and then

Patrick Thean:

accounting, For your ability to achieve your goals in a different way that is

Patrick Thean:

successful versus just whacking you on the head of a hammer on the end of the quarter

Patrick Thean:

saying I'm going to hold you accountable, because you didn't achieve your goal.

Patrick Thean:

It's like I want to hold you accountable to achieve your goal in the very

Patrick Thean:

beginning and help you all along the way.

Patrick Thean:

That's my version of accountability, which I found.

Patrick Thean:

works very well to help people achieve their plans.

Tim Winders:

No, I think you actually did a great job of answering the question.

Tim Winders:

It may have veered in some different directions, but it was a good thing.

Tim Winders:

And let me tell you why.

Tim Winders:

I learn a lot in the seat that I'm in.

Tim Winders:

First of all, I love asking questions.

Tim Winders:

You could probably tell.

Tim Winders:

And I also love that you could really learn a lot about people by hearing.

Tim Winders:

I think the scripture is, out of the heart comes the issues, out of the

Tim Winders:

mouth comes the issues of the heart or the, we can learn a lot about people.

Tim Winders:

I can learn what you're passionate about, but it leads to a question

Tim Winders:

that I want you to define for me.

Tim Winders:

And it's part of what we're about here.

Tim Winders:

And that is how we define success.

Tim Winders:

My observation from just listening to you is.

Tim Winders:

Success you, because you mentioned the exit and see so many people

Tim Winders:

would want to dig down on an exits.

Tim Winders:

oh, what was the financial aspect of it?

Tim Winders:

What did it mean?

Tim Winders:

This and that?

Tim Winders:

And I'm sure all that was great, but here's what I got from it.

Tim Winders:

I got that.

Tim Winders:

You learn something.

Tim Winders:

It was part of a growth process and it's now helping you to

Tim Winders:

continue learning and growing.

Tim Winders:

And then sharing that with other people at the same time and helping

Tim Winders:

not just you keep moving along and learning and being curious but you're

Tim Winders:

also helping other people use the word accountability a lot, which I think

Tim Winders:

is which is to me a code word for helping other people grow helping other

Tim Winders:

people move along but All of that is my observation to then ask you the question

Tim Winders:

How do you define success right now?

Tim Winders:

You probably have done great things financially.

Tim Winders:

And a lot of people in our world now would say, how many cars are in the garage?

Tim Winders:

What does the house look like and all that?

Tim Winders:

And I, if that's what it is for you, that's fine.

Tim Winders:

I'm not going to discount it.

Tim Winders:

But how does Patrick say I am successful when blank?

Patrick Thean:

So I think you're successful when you figure out

Patrick Thean:

what purpose God put you here for.

Patrick Thean:

and you're living it.

Patrick Thean:

That's what I believe.

Patrick Thean:

for me, success is exactly what I just said.

Patrick Thean:

figure out what, why you're here, what does God need you to do right

Patrick Thean:

now, and then just rest in that.

Patrick Thean:

And don't resist quite as much.

Patrick Thean:

So what I'm trying to say is, so I believe that we all have a

Patrick Thean:

purpose here and the faster you figure out yours, the better it is.

Patrick Thean:

Unfortunately, sometimes you got to go through a lot of pain and

Patrick Thean:

maybe have some success and failure before you figure out yours.

Patrick Thean:

So let's say you figure out your purpose.

Patrick Thean:

That's one.

Patrick Thean:

The second would be to now rest in that and allow God to lead you.

Patrick Thean:

In that, not trying to get religious on you, but if you do it right, the load

Patrick Thean:

that God carries for you should be lighter than the load you carry for yourself.

Patrick Thean:

to some degree, oftentimes, if you find a load too heavy, that tells me, even if

Patrick Thean:

you know what purpose God has for you, you may be struggling too hard to get there.

Patrick Thean:

And you might be doing it in a way that God didn't intend you to do it anyway.

Patrick Thean:

so for me, I've discovered that, I have the ability to, remember and to

Patrick Thean:

see patterns of companies and people.

Patrick Thean:

And then I have an ability to help bring those back and help leaders apply

Patrick Thean:

that experience to their circumstances and for them to choose a better path.

Patrick Thean:

Some people call that coaching and I guess that's the word we would use today.

Patrick Thean:

So I apply that in coaching and I've then created a framework to

Patrick Thean:

allow you to think, plan and do in such a way that it forces you.

Patrick Thean:

My framework forces you to have time to reflect, learn, plan, and

Patrick Thean:

then do, and do it all over again.

Patrick Thean:

Because I find that one of the biggest problems I saw in a lot of hard charging

Patrick Thean:

presidents and CEOs and leaders in general was this do, do, do thing.

Patrick Thean:

It's like they just wake up and they just want to do like robots

Patrick Thean:

just keep going harder and faster.

Patrick Thean:

And I found that if we just Took the right amount of time to reflect work on

Patrick Thean:

a business, not just in the business, we would succeed faster and actually in

Patrick Thean:

a way that doesn't wear us out as much.

Patrick Thean:

So that is my calling.

Patrick Thean:

My calling is to serve CEOs and leaders to help them rest a little

Patrick Thean:

bit so that they can actually not fail, but rather be successful

Patrick Thean:

because the failure rate is very high.

Patrick Thean:

So that's my personal calling.

Patrick Thean:

And then I would say that, I fall into the category of, I come from a family

Patrick Thean:

of workaholics, so my grandfather, died at 97, Workley was 91, my dad is now

Patrick Thean:

90, he's a retired judge in Singapore, but he worked, he was about 85, and

Patrick Thean:

basically my grandfather and my dad worked until they could no longer

Patrick Thean:

work, my father is medically unable to work, or he'd still be working.

Patrick Thean:

I come from a family of workaholics.

Patrick Thean:

Okay, so that being said, you that's how I'm programmed.

Patrick Thean:

So I purposefully look at that and say, just because that's how I'm programmed,

Patrick Thean:

is that the road that God wants me on?

Patrick Thean:

Do I have to take that same road?

Patrick Thean:

And by, by examining that truth and asking that question, I've concluded

Patrick Thean:

that I don't have to take that same road.

Patrick Thean:

I'm still going to work hard, but serving my wife and my two girls, my,

Patrick Thean:

my two children is more important to me.

Patrick Thean:

than working hard.

Patrick Thean:

but that was because I was able to take the time to examine that personal truth.

Patrick Thean:

So we're all programmed in certain ways.

Patrick Thean:

I'm trying to share, right?

Patrick Thean:

I'm programmed to be a workaholic.

Patrick Thean:

Okay.

Patrick Thean:

In other words, I grew up watching my parents work hard, hard.

Patrick Thean:

And I still remember I had attached a room to my parents and my dad would

Patrick Thean:

go to his home office and work at 9 p.

Patrick Thean:

m.

Patrick Thean:

And at 12 midnight the lights turn off and my dad works really hard.

Patrick Thean:

He worked till 12 midnight every day.

Patrick Thean:

And he worked on Saturdays and Sundays.

Patrick Thean:

And when he retired from being a judge, I, he took a part time role.

Patrick Thean:

He took a role at a firm in Singapore.

Patrick Thean:

And I asked him, I said, Dad, are you Working, are you taking a part time role?

Patrick Thean:

And he's 70 years old.

Patrick Thean:

And he said, if I take a part time role, what I'm going to

Patrick Thean:

do the rest of my time, right?

Patrick Thean:

So he's programmed to just work.

Patrick Thean:

and when I, when he said that it didn't sit well with my spirit.

Patrick Thean:

And I thought I admire my father for the hard work.

Patrick Thean:

I have a very hardworking ethic.

Patrick Thean:

But is that my role too?

Patrick Thean:

Do I want to say, I don't want to say that, I can tell you this much.

Patrick Thean:

The answer to my question is, I do not want to say, Hey, if I only

Patrick Thean:

work half time, part time, why don't I do the rest of my time?

Patrick Thean:

No, I want to be highly intentional with my time.

Patrick Thean:

100% of all the time that God has given me, I want to be highly intentional.

Patrick Thean:

If God has called me to work 100% of the time, I will do so.

Patrick Thean:

But I don't want to do it just because...

Patrick Thean:

I think I'm supposed to.

Patrick Thean:

for me, understanding that I'm here to serve, CEOs, help them to lead good

Patrick Thean:

companies, help them create jobs, and then to be a servant, serve my wife and

Patrick Thean:

my two girls, help them have the best life that they can be, that they can have.

Patrick Thean:

That's where I am.

Tim Winders:

that's so good because the thing that I heard was number one,

Tim Winders:

the way I word it is, success for me is identifying the assignment that I

Tim Winders:

have in God's kingdom and then doing all I can to move into that assignment

Tim Winders:

and operate in it every day, which is exactly roughly what I heard from you.

Tim Winders:

And then

Patrick Thean:

And in a way that's restful,

Tim Winders:

it

Patrick Thean:

in a way that's restful, because I don't think

Patrick Thean:

God has called us to be crazy.

Patrick Thean:

I think even when God calls us to do something, the magic is in allowing the

Patrick Thean:

power of God to work through you, right?

Patrick Thean:

Allowing the power of God to work through you, so that you don't get too big of

Patrick Thean:

an ego either, because we have to, for me, I realize that God works through me.

Patrick Thean:

isn't about how good Patrick is.

Patrick Thean:

So that allows me to...

Patrick Thean:

Maintain a healthy yet not overly healthy ego, if we, if something goes right, it's

Patrick Thean:

great, but it's not like I did everything it's so to me is I gotta be restful.

Patrick Thean:

I gotta be, I gotta be still.

Patrick Thean:

The scripture says, be still and know that I am God.

Patrick Thean:

So I got to be still and allow God to operate through me, which means

Patrick Thean:

that when we succeed, it's not I can't, if I believe that, then I

Patrick Thean:

shouldn't go, Hey, I did everything.

Patrick Thean:

I'm, I am God's gift to you.

Patrick Thean:

No, I'm not.

Patrick Thean:

I allowed God's gift to flow through me to you.

Patrick Thean:

I'm not God's gift to you.

Tim Winders:

if we really truly believe that we are created by A

Tim Winders:

creator, then doesn't it make sense that we would want that creator

Tim Winders:

to be a part of what we're doing.

Tim Winders:

And maybe he, he's got the manual to help us identify

Tim Winders:

what it is we were created for.

Tim Winders:

And I love the word you use.

Tim Winders:

You said that you guess that word is coach in today's world.

Tim Winders:

I actually have.

Tim Winders:

Come to believe that word is actually, we are disciples, we are discipling others.

Tim Winders:

And some people might get uncomfortable with people saying that in a, in

Tim Winders:

the business world, but I think that's exactly what we're doing.

Tim Winders:

But this is one thing I heard, I'm watching my time and I want to

Tim Winders:

make sure we bridge the gap here.

Tim Winders:

When I heard you say the word rest, the word rhythm popped into my mind.

Tim Winders:

Because it, to me, it is very difficult to get into a rhythm.

Tim Winders:

If you don't have some degree of rest, if you're restless, we talked at the

Tim Winders:

beginning about how some executive CEOs, they can't ever get to a rhythm

Tim Winders:

of just five minutes, one minute.

Tim Winders:

Of this habit, there has to be some degree of rest to get into the rhythm.

Tim Winders:

In the time we have left here, Patrick, what I'd love for you to do is to tie

Tim Winders:

together what you're doing with the book rhythm, how that book's been out

Tim Winders:

now for almost 10 years, and it's still going strong, how you're tying that in

Tim Winders:

with the systems and all that you have.

Tim Winders:

and if you can, the thing that I really loved was.

Tim Winders:

How important the, we've talked some about it, but maybe you can

Tim Winders:

bring that in here and, just a few minutes, those mature conversations

Tim Winders:

to me, but with accountability and communicating that to me seems like

Tim Winders:

something we're really lacking.

Tim Winders:

So talk a little bit about that.

Tim Winders:

And then we've got a couple of quick things we'll finish up with

Tim Winders:

in the last couple of minutes, but I love how this came together.

Tim Winders:

That was a great answer.

Tim Winders:

And I think it ties a lot of this together.

Tim Winders:

So thank you for that.

Patrick Thean:

you're welcome.

Patrick Thean:

so what I've learned is that the corporate world is very busy.

Patrick Thean:

And as you get more successful, you get busier.

Patrick Thean:

How do you actually reclaim time?

Patrick Thean:

Because if you don't figure out how to do that, you cannot succeed, right?

Patrick Thean:

If you think about it, as your company gets bigger, You have

Patrick Thean:

to actually learn how to manage something bigger with less time.

Patrick Thean:

Otherwise, you will not be scalable.

Patrick Thean:

Your company gets to a certain point and you just explode or implode.

Patrick Thean:

So the first thing that I, that most companies have to do when they

Patrick Thean:

meet me is they have to have the willingness to schedule the rhythm.

Patrick Thean:

It's impossible to say, hey, let's get together for a two day planning session,

Patrick Thean:

unless you've scheduled it way in advance.

Patrick Thean:

If you come up to this month and you go, hey, it's time for our two day

Patrick Thean:

planning session, free up the calendars, no one can free up the calendar.

Patrick Thean:

Stressful.

Patrick Thean:

So what you want to do is you want to schedule your rhythm.

Patrick Thean:

So my rhythm.

Patrick Thean:

Is what I'm trying to do is I'm really trying to put things, give people and

Patrick Thean:

companies specific times to think, to plan, and then to do their work.

Patrick Thean:

And when you have framework, you can put your mind at ease.

Patrick Thean:

so the think rhythm is about figuring out your strategy and to make sure that

Patrick Thean:

you have key winning moves of growth.

Patrick Thean:

The key winning moves for growth become the two or three things that you're

Patrick Thean:

really focused on and you've prioritized above everything else in your company.

Patrick Thean:

That's how you know what's important.

Patrick Thean:

So that's the first one is you can figure out what are the key priorities we have

Patrick Thean:

to use to grow our firm and therefore they become the most important things.

Patrick Thean:

That's prioritization.

Patrick Thean:

The second step is on a every quarter we get together and have the right

Patrick Thean:

discussions and then figure out what I call your plan for the next 13 weeks

Patrick Thean:

because every quarter is a 13 week race.

Patrick Thean:

And if you can have a great year, you're going to have it one quarter at a time.

Patrick Thean:

And if you have four great quarters, you have a great year.

Patrick Thean:

Within the quarter, there are 13 weeks.

Patrick Thean:

And the only way to have a great quarter is to have a

Patrick Thean:

great week, one week at a time.

Patrick Thean:

So we plan for the quarter and then on a weekly basis, I have something

Patrick Thean:

we call a WAM, a Weekly Adjustment Meeting, different from a status meeting.

Patrick Thean:

Most companies have a status meeting where they come together and discuss the status.

Patrick Thean:

It's actually a very expensive meeting.

Patrick Thean:

So for me, I'm like, why come together for a status?

Patrick Thean:

Why don't you provide the status ahead of time, come together and solve problems.

Patrick Thean:

Make adjustments, look at the accountabilities and figure out what's

Patrick Thean:

not working and make the adjustment.

Patrick Thean:

Hence we call it a weekly adjustment meeting.

Patrick Thean:

Not a status meeting, right?

Patrick Thean:

So now you have a place and that's part of my do rhythm to let you do

Patrick Thean:

the work, and I like to say nothing happens unless you do the work.

Patrick Thean:

so now what happens is that when something comes up during the week, instead of

Patrick Thean:

going to a crisis, you can say, okay, let me park that and have that discussion

Patrick Thean:

in two days in my weekly meeting.

Patrick Thean:

And so we don't have to go crazy here now.

Patrick Thean:

If it's a crisis, then yes, I agree, drop everything and go take care of the crisis.

Patrick Thean:

But a lot of crises were created because we didn't, the company

Patrick Thean:

didn't have the right rhythms.

Patrick Thean:

To prevent the crisis.

Patrick Thean:

So you can either be in fire prevention mode, which is what my framework

Patrick Thean:

gives you a firefighting mode.

Patrick Thean:

So in fire prevention mode, every week you have a weekly meeting where you

Patrick Thean:

have the opportunity to discuss stuff.

Patrick Thean:

So I've given you a place.

Patrick Thean:

There are not that many things that happen on a weekly basis that

Patrick Thean:

have to be attended to right now.

Patrick Thean:

So executives and leaders need to learn a bit of patience to say, let's

Patrick Thean:

pop that into our weekly meeting and have that discussion instead of

Patrick Thean:

distracting and call and ringing the crisis bell and distracting all the

Patrick Thean:

other employees that work for us.

Patrick Thean:

And then usually Some wonderful idea pops up in the middle of the quarter,

Patrick Thean:

but a bad thing happens is that the leader goes, Oh, I got a great idea.

Patrick Thean:

It's week seven.

Patrick Thean:

Do it now.

Patrick Thean:

Okay.

Patrick Thean:

But what about all the other stuff that we had already planned?

Patrick Thean:

Forget that.

Patrick Thean:

Do this now.

Patrick Thean:

So I would say no.

Patrick Thean:

Don't do that.

Patrick Thean:

Instead, put that in the list of things to discuss at your quarterly

Patrick Thean:

planning session, where you can take that and compare it to all the other

Patrick Thean:

priorities that you have and make a holistic decision on whether you want to

Patrick Thean:

attack that new opportunity, yes or no.

Patrick Thean:

So some of this has is actually, I'm giving you various spots for you to put

Patrick Thean:

things so that you don't go into a frenzy, go into a crisis when things happen.

Patrick Thean:

So that is the framework.

Patrick Thean:

That's why the rhythm works.

Patrick Thean:

And that's why it creates the space.

Patrick Thean:

For people to rest, think, plan, do, and rest in the middle of that as well.

Tim Winders:

And communicate.

Tim Winders:

It sounds like you've got a lot of places to have those, what I called

Tim Winders:

earlier, mature conversations.

Tim Winders:

And they're on the calendar versus, oh, you know what?

Tim Winders:

I'll talk to your Jack you mentioned earlier.

Tim Winders:

I'll talk to Jack about that situation that occurred last week when we,

Tim Winders:

whenever I can or at the water cooler.

Tim Winders:

And that's usually means it doesn't happen.

Tim Winders:

Correct.

Patrick Thean:

That's

Tim Winders:

So you've got the structure in place.

Tim Winders:

All right.

Tim Winders:

excellent structure.

Tim Winders:

I love that rhythm.

Tim Winders:

I actually am sitting here listening, going this a lot of

Tim Winders:

what I quarterly, my mind works quarterly and then I chunk it down.

Tim Winders:

I don't think many times I loved way back when we would

Tim Winders:

say, what's our five year goal?

Tim Winders:

What's our, which I love long term planning.

Tim Winders:

But 90 days, man, give me 90 days.

Tim Winders:

And I think you do a few 90 days, you could change the world, have a huge

Tim Winders:

impact, Patrick, where can people find you and, give us a little info on

Tim Winders:

the book and where to go to get that or anything else you want to do to

Tim Winders:

share right here where people can get some resources and connect with you.

Patrick Thean:

So if you come to my website, rhythmsystems.

Patrick Thean:

com, there are a few things I can give you.

Patrick Thean:

The first is that, I have a, I have an assessment that you can take

Patrick Thean:

that will help you, you understand a little bit more about what you can do.

Patrick Thean:

And it's a free assessment.

Patrick Thean:

So please enjoy yourself and take that.

Patrick Thean:

So come to rhythmsystems.

Patrick Thean:

com and you can find that.

Patrick Thean:

Secondly, We are the first, by the way, in our category of gold

Patrick Thean:

management to actually create an AI powered business coach.

Patrick Thean:

So if you come to my website, there's a button called ask Patrick.

Patrick Thean:

and this is one of those where my product manager thought it was funny.

Patrick Thean:

So he called it, ask Patrick.

Patrick Thean:

And I, he announced the product and I looked at him and he

Patrick Thean:

announced it at our conference.

Patrick Thean:

And I said, Ryan, you didn't tell me you're doing that.

Patrick Thean:

And he said, Patrick, this is one of those times where I learned from you.

Patrick Thean:

It's better to ask for forgiveness.

Patrick Thean:

Then permission.

Patrick Thean:

So the product is called Ask Patrick, because he didn't ask me permission.

Patrick Thean:

But anyway, if you go there, it's, you can play with our AI powered business coach.

Patrick Thean:

So it's like having a reliable 24 by seven consultant for any strategy

Patrick Thean:

and execution related questions, all built around the concepts that

Patrick Thean:

I shared in the discussion today.

Patrick Thean:

so we provide about 10 free questions for people to just try

Patrick Thean:

it and have some fun with it.

Tim Winders:

Should I have interviewed AI Patrick or real Patrick?

Tim Winders:

should we have brought him in on this interview?

Patrick Thean:

absolutely.

Patrick Thean:

By the way, it's pretty funny because, we have two pieces of AI in our software.

Patrick Thean:

One is this Ask Patrick, where you can actually engage in strategic questions.

Patrick Thean:

In our software, we also have an AI goal setting coach, because

Patrick Thean:

one, one thing that is really hard is setting really good goals.

Patrick Thean:

So most people write goals like, Increase sales.

Patrick Thean:

That's not very good.

Patrick Thean:

So if you go into our software and you wrote as a goal increase sales,

Patrick Thean:

you hit the smart coach button.

Patrick Thean:

It uses AI to come back with three options for you may come back

Patrick Thean:

with stuff like increased sales by 20% by the end of this quarter.

Patrick Thean:

So it will actually take your thoughts.

Patrick Thean:

And create a goal for you that you can then accept or, Oh, I like

Patrick Thean:

it, but I'm going to tweak it a little bit and resubmit it to the

Patrick Thean:

AI goal writing coach and it will regenerate three new options for you.

Patrick Thean:

And I gotta tell you, I've played with it even myself and we do our planning.

Patrick Thean:

I'm like, all we really need to increase sales this quarter

Patrick Thean:

for this particular product.

Patrick Thean:

And I popped that in, I hit the AI coach and boom, it gave me

Patrick Thean:

a better version, even for me.

Patrick Thean:

it's fun.

Patrick Thean:

It's fun to play with.

Tim Winders:

I think there's so much there with AI.

Tim Winders:

We could go off on a tangent, but I want to ask my final question.

Tim Winders:

We are seek, go create here, Patrick, those three words.

Tim Winders:

I'm gonna let you pick one of those words over the other two.

Tim Winders:

That means more resonates with you right now, whatever.

Tim Winders:

Seek, go or create which one and why.

Patrick Thean:

I picked Seek because.

Patrick Thean:

I teach that curiosity is the, is really the foundation of all things.

Patrick Thean:

when I get this all the time, I get a executive leader that says to me, Patrick,

Patrick Thean:

I got my 360 feedback and one thing my team wants me to learn is learn how to.

Patrick Thean:

Listen better.

Patrick Thean:

I get that all the time.

Patrick Thean:

and I've learned that you actually don't have to learn how to listen better.

Patrick Thean:

If you want to learn how to listen better, just learn to be a little bit more curious

Patrick Thean:

and interested in the other person.

Patrick Thean:

And so I picked the word seek.

Patrick Thean:

I think if more people would be more curious and do a little bit more seeking,

Patrick Thean:

there'll be less arguments all around.

Tim Winders:

I love that.

Tim Winders:

Be curious, Patrick, thank you for this conversation.

Tim Winders:

It has been so enjoyable to me.

Tim Winders:

I've enjoyed so many aspects of it If you've listened in, please share

Tim Winders:

this episode with someone else.

Tim Winders:

I know that Patrick said something that someone, needs to hear.

Tim Winders:

So the best way that people get exposed to podcasts like this, this

Tim Winders:

information, this type of, teaching and training that we like to do here is

Tim Winders:

when someone texts them a screenshot or.

Tim Winders:

Shares it.

Tim Winders:

If you're listening on YouTube or one of the podcast platforms, please do that.

Tim Winders:

We have new episodes every Monday until next time, continue being

Tim Winders:

all that you were created to be.

About the Podcast

Show artwork for Seek Go Create
Seek Go Create
Redefining Success in Leadership, Business & Ministry

About your host

Profile picture for Tim Winders

Tim Winders

Tim Winders is a faith driven executive coach and author with over 40 years of experience in leadership, business, and ministry. Through his personal journey of redefining success, he has gained valuable insights on how to align beliefs with work and lead with purpose. He is committed to helping others do the same, running a coaching business that helps leaders, leadership teams, business owners, and entrepreneurs to align their beliefs with their work and redefine success.

In addition to his coaching business, Tim is also the host of the SeekGoCreate podcast and author of the book Coach: A Story of Success Redefined, which provides guidance for those looking to redefine success and align their beliefs with their work. With his extensive background, unique perspective and strengths in strategic thinking, relationship building, and problem-solving, Tim is well-suited to help clients navigate through difficult times and achieve their goals.